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Hard to tell as much as necessary about the dogs on all the gears with them assembled on the shafts, but 2 of those 3 shift forks (the 2 in center and right) have got to go and honestly, there is some wear on the tips of the one on the far left as well but it's probably serviceable. Anytime you see scoring on the sides of a shift fork, it means either the fork is slightly tweaked because someone pounded the shifter with a heavy foot or it jumped out of gear repeatedly and either way, it should be replaced. The forks will tell you where they go as you assemble everything, since if you have one in the wrong spot or backwards it won't shift properly into every gear on the bench while partially assembled. I suppose it could happen, but I've not seen enough wear on a shift drum to warrant replacement in my experiences and without being able to zoom the last picture, yours seems to look decent

Edit: I saw the end of the page (my settings show 40 posts per page IIRC) and thought it was the last one...
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
The drum is in good condition-- channels all tight, no wear marks visible.

The set of forks I ordered are in decent condition. Some light surface rust. One of them has a small amount of wear in the same area as mine, but not near as bad. I didn't plan to use that one though.

I do have pictures of the fork orientation, so no problem reassembling that. The two outer forks are the same, so it shouldn't matter which position it was in when I took it out. Besides potentially causing a little bit of wear if I don't guess right.

I haven't looked super close at the dog ears on the gears. They didn't look abnormally worn to me at first glance, but yeah I need to really inspect them fully. I'll take some pictures too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Gears are confirmed in great shape.


But I got bad news elsewhere. I measured the connecting rod small end inside diameter, and came up with .616 on one and .617 on the other. Manual says replace if over .593! Crankshafts aren't cheap either, and none of the eBay listings mention these measurements.
 

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Gears are confirmed in great shape.


But I got bad news elsewhere. I measured the connecting rod small end inside diameter, and came up with .616 on one and .617 on the other. Manual says replace if over .593! Crankshafts aren't cheap either, and none of the eBay listings mention these measurements.
well, that sucks - but as many 350s as there are out there, you should be able to pick up a parts bike and get a good crank and have parts to sell to recoup the investment. just look for an abandoned cafe project, there are a lot of those :D
 

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As you rotate the shift drum to change from one gear to another, you have to also rotate at least one transmission shaft so it allows the dogs on the gears to align, then the drum will be in position for the next gear change. And remember the alignment pins on the small ends of the trans shafts so the bearing caps sit fully into the upper case before putting the lower case on and tightening the bolts, or the caps will push the pins out through the aluminum of the upper case as you already have one of from the PO (you did get that fixed, right?)

BTW, nice tactic using the window frame... :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
As you rotate the shift drum to change from one gear to another

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pins out through the aluminum of the upper case as you already have one of from the PO (you did get that fixed, right?)
Yep, I know gears must be in motion to change, but what's the best method of rotating the shift drum?


And, I will be well aware of the pin locations on this reassembly! The bad one was fixed up with weld (there's a picture a couple posts back) and the other just needs a bit of JB in the hole before the pin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
As it turns out, using a #3 Phillips (or actually, JIS) turn the screw (24 in below fiche) works decently. Still need a third hand to either hold the shafts in place and/or rotate the shaft, but it's do-able. I took some videos I'll try to post later...

 

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I saw your question last night just as I was going to bed and didn't want to take the time to be sure your drum had a JIS screw in the end of it, even though I was fairly sure it did. That's what I do to turn the drum, and another trick is to turn the mainshaft back and forth while turning the shift drum (instead of steady rotation in one direction) and that usually works pretty well... sometimes you have to reach around and turn the countershaft a little along the way, but it allows you to do it with just your own two hands
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
While I'm waiting on a 'new' crankshaft, I've asked a friend who runs a garage if they do valve grinding. He was real reluctant about it, I guess it's a pain in the butt to set up the machine for a smaller block. If I'm using the same valves that came out of the head, do they need to be ground? Of course, I don't know Left from Right since I took them out an awfully long time ago and am apparently very bad at labeling things.
 

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If the valves look good when closely inspected, just lap them in using lapping compound and a lapping tool. The proper way to lap in a valve is to turn it back and forth, not spinning the same direction as some do with, say, a drill... that's the "easy" way and it simply creates a groove in the face of the valve
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Getting the cases together was a big ‘mental block’ for me. This engine was disassembled in 2013, put into storage for a year, shoved into a closet for another 4. I’ve very slowly gotten stuff done on it over the years, but I’ve been dreading tackling the engine. The lower end was intimidating in particular. In the end, it honestly wasn’t that difficult; I had all the parts I needed and was meticulous with checking off parts fiches to make sure I’ve got everything in place.


There’s still a lot to do on every aspect; Next up is milling the head for the KA slipper.
 

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PS new shift forks installed!
I was looking at this picture and the first picture in your most recent post where the cases are assembled (post #56), and I'm concerned that the small end bearing on the countershaft (opposite end of the shaft where the front sprocket goes) might not be properly seated on the pin in the upper case. The first picture in your most recent post doesn't zoom enough for me to tell if the pin punched through the upper case but in the pic in this post about replacing the shift forks, the bearing looks a bit to the outside of where it should be to engage the locating pin in the upper case... it's probably okay, but I just don't want to see you button the whole thing up and discover a problem later
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Yep, the dang PO got 2/3 locator pins wrong! They are correctly seated this time, I promise. The countershaft penetration wasn't bad, I was able to get by with some quiksteel putty.

Also on the way is a 20mm needle bearing for the countershaft since my bearing cap is broke. No idea if that's critical or not, but why not replace it while I'm here.

I also found more damage, of the same variety as before! Dummy PO didn't line up another one of the bearing keeper pins before clamping the cases. So, he got 1/3 right...



This one at least isn't so critical.
 
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