Honda Twins banner
21 - 40 of 74 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,005 Posts
I think I'd be worried about trying to repair the crack in the upper case where the cylinder jugs sit. That was caused by the Bearing Alingment Pin NOT being seated in the Hole for the Bearing Race when the Cases were assembled. The Pin was pushed Up and crack out the Side Wall of the case - No Place else to go.

The Crack on the Oil Windage Plate can be welede but you will have to drill out the tops of the points where it is riveted in place then drill and Tap for Bolts.

If you decide to attempt a repair on the upper case here's how I would go about it.

Pry out the chips that are broken out.
CLEAN - CLEAN - CLEAN
Pull the Alignment Pin out.
Assemble the Case halves with the Alignment Pin in the Bearing Race.
Make sure the Pin is fully seated in the Bearing Race (from the look of the crack you should be able to push it down once the chips are removed).
Have someone TIG Over the Pin and Fill In Most of what was removed from the chips. The TIG won't stick if it's not cleaned properly. But also should not Weld to the Pin as the Temp Required for the Aluminium should be low enough.
Take a Dremel Grinder to clean up the are and make sure the Clinder Jugs seat correctly.

I know this will work as I had a similar issue with a Pin on the transmission shaft and that's how we fixed it.

Or Just pick up a case set on Ebay. All CB & CL Cases are the same for 350's. The early SL will also work the later ones were Kick Start ONLY.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,005 Posts
99.9999......% Someone has been there before you. It's very unlikely the factory made that error.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Update time:

Yesterday, I performed a leakdown test (well, what I thought was a leakdown test):
Starting out - poured Acetone in the up-turned valve head


After ~12 minutes


After ~60 minutes


I just assumed I was supposed to pour it in there and see how if it held or if it leaked. I think mine leaked, but after reading up a bit I realize I may have misunderstood the test. Did the acetone just evaporate, or is there a leak? I'm a dummy and didn't put a rag or anything under it so I couldn't tell for sure.

I also went to disassemble the other shock so I could get those finished this week. My method:



Unfortunately, that failed. I think I used 8 zip ties on the other one (disassembled a few months ago), but I only used 6 yesterday and they popped. Regardless, I would not be able to reassemble using this method, so I'm trying to come up with something else...



I found these plates at a hardware store for around 40 cents a pop. I ground the little tabs off (you can see one off in the picture), and it just fits around the wide internal shock part. I think I can get some long bolts and nuts, and use this as a makeshift spring compressor. I'll let you know how it turns out...!

Current state of things:




:!: Yeah, need to get that engine back together before I forget everything, or maybe that ship has sailed! I kind of want to get a rolling frame first, though. To do that, I need to 1) get my 3rd wheel disassembled so I that I can 2) begin soaking all my rusted parts together in some Bar Keeper's Friend mix. Also need to wait on that before I can put my head/triple tree back on, because one of the pieces of that was all rusted up. I love the way the new bearings look, though!


Will just any grease work on those? I have some general purpose, but I wanted to check first to see if there was a specific kind I needed to use.

I'm going to hopefully be hitting this project a lot harder in the next few weeks... I'm ready to get it going! Unfortunately, I'm a procrastinator at heart, so instead I make neat little modifications to my workbench.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Spring compression Method # 2 Tried and failed. It failed because 1) the plates bent when I compressed them, and 2) the plates would slip off once there was significant resistance. If I had used two plates, it might have worked, but that was a very un-elegant solution.

I was googling around for some other methods, not having much luck. I came across a post to photobucket (and now I can't find it again to link it) with three pictures of a shock reassembly-- there was no description and the pictures were TINY, thumbnail sized, but I couldn't find a bigger version. From those pictures I was able to puzzle out what was going on, and took a trip to the hardware store. I had to describe the thing I saw in the picture because I had no idea what it would be called, but luckily the employee at the store knew what it was. It's called a Turnbuckle! Two of those, coupled with some S hooks and a bolt, and BOOM, my spring is compressed and the second shock is disassembled. It took about 10 minutes and was completely painless. This method should work to reassemble as well, I'll just have to be careful not to scratch the new paint.



Very excited I can finish my shocks now! They will be done by this weekend, and I should be able to attach the swingarm to the frame.

I got my 'new' rim/wheel in, so I've got to get that apart and then soak a ton of parts in Bar Keeper's Friend, then finally I can begin assembling my rolling frame. From there I'll probably work on my wiring / electrical, concurrently with the engine. I still need to check tolerances on all the engine parts and get my cylinders honed/bored, as well as get those cracks fixed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,005 Posts
Bar Keepers Friend is just Oxalic Acid mixed with a little scouring powder.

If you are soaking the parts just go right for the Oxalic Acid - it can be found at most hardware stores (but Not Lowes or Home Depot) - Sold under the name of Wood Bleach. I found it at Ace Hardware.
[attachment=0:90jvc2sr]WoodBleach.jpg[/attachment:90jvc2sr]

Here an On-Line Link:

http://www.hardwareworld.com/Wood-Bleac ... 4Aodg0wAxw
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Alright, time for an update.

Thanks for the tip on straight oxalic acid, Yendor.. I ended up using BKF anyways because I already had it though.

Before:
Rear Spokes
Front Spokes
Spoke heads
Shock Spring
Steering Stem retainer thing
Bonus rusty tools

Ready to soak:


Sprinkle on 'a little' BKF:

(I had 4/5ths of a can left, so i used pretty much all I had left)

And soaking!

I will take some pictures tonight and post results tonight or tomorrow. Unfortunately, it didn't work that well. It worked great on the chrome parts, as expected, but the unfinished metal (pretty much everything besides the shock spring and part of the fork tubes) remained pretty rusty and ugly. I suppose from this I learned that Oxalic Acid works to restore chrome, not remove rust, as I previously assumed.

I was able to complete my shocks, though! In progress: http://i.imgur.com/uGKANBg.jpg

Finished!


Only, not really. I scratched the paint real good on one of them near the top of the tube, I'll need to touch that up. I also want to paint the nylon spacer/divider, I don't like the off-white contrast. I'm also toying with the idea of painting the springs black, but that will require stripping the chome, yeah? And even then, I suspect the paint might crack when the spring is compressed. I'll probably end up leaving them chromed.

Last night, I assembled the headstock. I forgot to strip/paint the big nut that holds it all together, so it's not complete, but I put the new bearings in and put the retaining part on to keep it in place. It turns smoothly, but it seems like there's more resistance than when I had the old ball bearings. That may be because the forks aren't in so there's not much weight leverage, but I did want to ask if that's normal. Also, the retaining part I mentioned (#10 here) threads on less than one turn... I don't think that's normal. I used the proper spacer under the bottom bearing, but it seems like the stem won't go up far enough in the headstock. Any thoughts there?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,901 Posts
The top nut #10 needs to have all the threads fully engaged and preferably extending past the nut. You may need to loose the bottom spacer to accomplish that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I'll have to look into that. I don't look forward to having to remove the bottom bearing!

I took some pictures at lunch for 'after' the bath:







As you can see, on some of the spokes it worked really well, but on a majority it didn't do much except loosen it up a bit. These were taken after a little scrubbing with a scotchbrite pad. I bet it will come off with a wire wheel now.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Long time, no post. I had planned to be done with the rebuild in winter, but Life happened and the pieces got put into storage. Well, I finally started pulling them out, and yesterday I polished up the hubs. I will be replacing the bearings and hopefully rebuilding/lacing the rear wheel this weekend.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Another winter, with no work on the bike :oops: Too busy pimping my truck: Red Baron - Nissan Frontier Forum

Wheels are done:
Rim Wheel Spoke Alloy wheel Bicycle wheel


OK not really... I need to have them trued, then mounted. First step is to get that damn collar out of the old bearing, second is putting the new bearings in the hubs. I'm taking the old bearing to a buddy who can extract the collar and possibly machine me a new one, as it's pretty chewed up from me trying to free it.

I started work in earnest on the engine today. Got a little overwhelmed since it's been 2.5 years since I took this thing apart, and I sure don't remember where all these pieces go. I just have to take it slow and study parts fiches religiously as I assemble. I've got to order some Hondabond and a cam chain, but I'm almost ready to assemble the bottom halves.

I'll try to keep this thread updated. I sure hope I stay on-task these next few weeks...!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Nice work CLOFAN. I'm just getting started on my '68 CL350...so I'll go other all of your posts.

Re your comment "don't remember where all these pieces go", this forum has links to a few of the manuals - although I'm sure you've already got them. I find the detail there very interesting. I'll order a Clymer manual this week.

I'm not sure I'll tackle the engine on my own - I might give that to an engine guy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #35 · (Edited)
Hmm, I guess it's about time to update this thing. New shoes! No more asbestos

Auto part Tire Automotive wheel system Automotive tire Personal protective equipment


Got the headstock assembled
Bicycle part Bicycle drivetrain part Bicycle wheel Bicycle Vehicle


Wheels trued, this is my homeade tool for tightening the bearing retainer nut. It worked really well
Auto part Wheel Disc brake Rotor Rim


Tapped the swingarm hols so I could use a traditional zerk fitting
Screw Ammunition Brass Bullet Metal


Swingwarm and shocks in place!
Bicycle part Bicycle Bicycle fork Bicycle frame Vehicle


Rear wheel on. Not torqued or anything obviously, but gets me halfway to a rolling frame
Bicycle wheel Vehicle Bicycle accessory Bicycle Bicycle frame


Forks in
Vehicle


Wheel in... my fender is bent. Wheel appears center, however...
Tire Automotive tire Wheel Tread Auto part


There is a small gap between the right fork (as you are sitting on the bike) and the first spacer.
Auto part Photography Machine tool Machine Wheel


No gap on the left fork.
Auto part Brake Wheel Tire Vehicle brake


My very first fabricated piece of metal. It isn't much, sure, but it serves my purpose as...
Technology Material property Gadget Electronic device Wood


Turn signal mount!
Bicycle part Tire Bicycle wheel Spoke Bicycle drivetrain part


Lights in action.
Tire Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle Automotive lighting


To do....
Footwear Metal Bicycle part Shoe
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,047 Posts
The question now is "Is there a gap between the "head" end of the axle and the spacer?"...Or only between the fork slider and the spacer?.....
With the wheel airborne, slightly loosen the fork-tube pinch bolts on that side.....Rotate the fork tube within the slider and pinches....IF the end of the slider does not move in and out or fore and aft, the tube is straight......IF, after re tightening the pinches, the forks will rebound and compress smoothly (no binding or "sticking") when the wheel is blocked against a wall, the tubes are parallel......

Does the wheel and tire MEASURE centered?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Steve,
This is the one I had called you about yesterday. There is no gap between the 'head' of the axle and the spacer; HOWEVER, the axle is a few MM from being fully pinched by the bottom bridge piece. So, if the head of the axle were flush with the lower fork clamp pieces, I don't think there would be a gap. I haven't had the chance to try the suggestions you gave me to see if these things will square up, but I will do those soon. And I will measure too! Thanks again
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Hello HondaTwins! I'm back again. I've cleared some hurdles and got a new garage so I'm going to do this thing.

I was going to take my parts to a machinist for measurement to make sure everything is within spec, but unfortunately living in a rural area means that's a challenge. So, instead I've just ordered some micrometers (0-1" and 2-3"), dial bore gauge, hole gauges and small hole gauges. I imagine I will use the tools exactly once and never again, but who knows.

Also on the way is a 20mm needle bearing for the countershaft since my bearing cap is broke. No idea if that's critical or not, but why not replace it while I'm here.

I also found more damage, of the same variety as before! Dummy PO didn't line up another one of the bearing keeper pins before clamping the cases. So, he got 1/3 right...



This one at least isn't so critical.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #40 · (Edited)
By the way, here is a picture of the repaired damage to the upper crankcase:






I’ve started the process of inspection and measurement. I’m wondering if I will need to replace one drum fork… what do you think? The service manual says to look for rubbing on one side, and I definitely see that.










The forks have some identification marks on them.


Fork 1- Y and 01 (This is my problem fork, on the Y side. It's the one in the center above)
Fork 2 - V and 52
Center (smaller) Fork - P and 21


I am sorry to say, I do not know which order these forks came out in, so I am unsure which transmission gear the rub is on. They look OK to me, I don’t really see any obvious wear but my eye is untrained. Here are some pictures:


Countershaft right:



Countershaft Right rotated 180*:



Countershaft left:



Countershaft left rotated 180*:



Finally, I tried to measure the drum shaft. The manual shows measuring using a micrometer, but gives the measurement specs of trench width. I ended up using a caliper to make sure the wide is no wider with 6.5mm, but I don’t really understand the illustration vs. the text.





 
21 - 40 of 74 Posts
Top