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Discussion Starter #1
First post, been lurking for a few weeks.
To make a long story as short as possible - I bought this bike for a couple hundred bucks. Decided I could make it my project. I’ve done basic work on bikes for years but this is my first time opening up an engine. So bare with me.
Apparently this bike has been sitting outside for 25+ years, and it shows. Cam chain was broken when I removed the head. Cam chain guide/tensioner was a mess. Have both of those parts on the way.
I’m planning on splitting the cases tomorrow and cleaning it out, but earlier tonight I opened up the oil filter and found this...

it’s magnetic. I cleaned out the filter but I have no idea what to do now. I’m assuming i need to flush the whole motor. Any advice on how to do that would be appreciated. Really hoping you guys don’t tell me “it’s toast.”

Thank you.
 

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Duke, with that kind of magnetic buildup in the oil filter, you need to tear down the entire engine. A flush won't tell you what is wrong and at its age and with what you've discovered, you need to inspect everything to expect any kind of long-term reliability from it.

That said, since you're now a member and plan to participate, you need to introduce yourself to the community. Please check your Conversations as below, read and follow the links I sent you - thanks.
305075
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you
Duke, with that kind of magnetic buildup in the oil filter, you need to tear down the entire engine. A flush won't tell you what is wrong and at its age and with what you've discovered, you need to inspect everything to expect any kind of long-term reliability from it.

That said, since you're now a member and plan to participate, you need to introduce yourself to the community. Please check your Conversations as below, read and follow the links I sent you - thanks.
View attachment 305075
Duke, with that kind of magnetic buildup in the oil filter, you need to tear down the entire engine. A flush won't tell you what is wrong and at its age and with what you've discovered, you need to inspect everything to expect any kind of long-term reliability from it.

That said, since you're now a member and plan to participate, you need to introduce yourself to the community. Please check your Conversations as below, read and follow the links I sent you - thanks.
View attachment 305075
Thank you for your reply, I made an introduction post and followed your steps to familiarize myself with the site.

I’ve got the top end torn down, both side covers off and am planning on splitting the cases this weekend. I’ll do a visual inspection from there. Hopefully I can determine the source from that and act accordingly.

I noticed this wear on the clutch housing - does this look like normal wear or could this be one of if not the primary source?
 

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Thanks for reading the forum info and taking care of the intro. If you're referring to the marks at the back of the aluminum basket outer just to the right (in the picture) of the gear teeth, that isn't wear. It looked that way when new, part of the original machining process AFAIK. Either way, that's aluminum and you said your filings were magnetic. With that much in the oil filter body, you should do a complete teardown to be sure of everything
 

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Plus one on completely stripping the engine down to nuts and bolts. Take lots of pictures as you go. Each and every piece will need to be inspected and measured against the specs in the FSM.
If in doubt about any piece post a picture of it and we can help out. I've just finished building my engine and slowly working on assembling the bike which was completely stripped down.
 

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ok great. Think I’ll just setup a camera a video the whole process so I can refer back to that for reassembly.
Thanks for your help!
As we've said many times before to others in your position, start a Project Log for the engine work and post plenty of pictures so we can follow along. The community will see the pictures and often point out things of importance, and you'll get plenty of exposure and all the info and advice that comes with it. We've helped many first-timers through engine rebuilds they've never done before, including an 18 year old in the last year and a half (project still in process) on a 350 just like yours.
 
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