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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These seem to be commonly needed parts that are not available any more. #11 is the shift drum stopper and 15 is the neutral stopper.



I decided to see if I could repair the ones from my spare engine cases.

The axles that the 2 rollers ride on wear out and cause the rollers to be off center causing shifting problems. Here's what worn out ones look like. Notice how the roller are not centered.





I drilled out the riveted ends of both rollers and used a small punch to drive out the axles. This is the shift drum stopper and you can see the wear on the axle. The ID of the roller is perfect, very hard material.



This is the axle from the neutral one.



For the shift drum I measured the ID of the roller at .277". I found a 8mm bolt with a shaft size slightly larger and chucked it in the drill press and used a file to remove the flats of the head and remove material from the shaft until it measured .275".







Then I ground down the length until the shaft was .005" longer than the thickness of the roller.



I center punched the center of the shaft.



Then I drilled a 9/64" hole and tapped it with 8-32 machine screw threads for a machine screw.









Here's the finished product.





I had a little interference with the bearing for the shift drum so I had to grind a bit more off the head of the bolt to provide clearance.



It finished up like this.



The neutral stopper was similar but I used a 6mm bolt, it was the perfect size for the ID of the roller.







Also tapped for a 8-32 machine screw.







The 8-32 machine screw is the perfect size to pass through the hole in both levers with no slop, it's a slight interference fit. Here they are test fitted in the case for the final time. I didn't put the springs on for the test fit.





Some blue loctite on the threads and jam nuts installed so the screws will not come loose. Here they are ready to be installed.

 

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johnnyc14 said:
Thanks Bill, no machine shop required, just a bench grinder, angle grinder, drill press, taps and dies, and some files.

OK - I have a file (meekly)......

:( :( :cry:
 

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don't know if I would trust a screw setup like that, might have been easier to peen or stake the axle on the backside like the original
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
jayel said:
don't know if I would trust a screw setup like that, might have been easier to peen or stake the axle on the backside like the original
I have to disagree with you there. The load on both rollers is carried in the same way as the original, in the interface between the axle and the lever. There is no radial load on the screw, only the axial load to keep the axle pulled tight to the lever. With the use of loctite and a jam nut there is no possibility of the parts coming loose and the conection of the axle to the lever and much stronger than the original riveted/peened soft metal one.
 

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Thanks. Very neat job. I may some day find myself confronted by that problem, although I'm very nice to my gears as a rule. I sometimes find it takes up less of my time to make a part than it does to find it and get it, even if it exists. You didn't mention hardening the roller before installation - just wondering, did you do that? Would it be/not be advisable?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The rollers are original, the axles are what I replaced. The original axles were mild steel so they were easy to drill out but the rollers were very hard. I guess the new axles could have been hardened after the threads were cut and they were machined to the final size but I didn't think to do it. I'd have to read up on how it's done, I remember learning in my high school shop class but that was a couple of years ago (37).
 

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Thanks for the work/info/ideas here John...

I had the very same problem and I just swapped my stopper assembly out with some new parts from a very low mileage bike. But I'm sure, given time, they'll get wobbly as well! This will surely come in handy down the road a few miles!
 
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