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Discussion Starter #1
1. Los Angeles, CA
2. 1968 Honda CL350

I am just getting to know my bike and got the Clymer manual. It has a lot of repair/rebuild information, but I am just starting out and learning about how motorcycles run and basic operation.

I know there has been some upgrades on my bike, but I am trying to understand how it all works and how to take care of it. I have been struggling recently to get it idling. I finally figure out the other day that I had not used the second choke lever that I found on the bike, buried underneath.

Can someone help me understand more about why there are two choke levers and how to use them best? I let the bike warm up and then clicked them back, and I finally got the bike to idle, but it wasn't working great the next day.

I have the fuel lever set on reserve to start, but shouldn't it be "ON" for riding?

Also - what are the best ways to monitor how much gas/oil the bike has, and how much it needs? When should I get the oil changed?
I know these are all very basic questions, but I have been struggling to find information online about this older bike, and I want to make sure I am taking care of it to keep it running smooth.

Please let me know if you have any online suggestions or manuals that offer basic operation for this bike.

Thank you
 

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Your bike has 2 choke levers because it has Mikuni carbs on it, not the original Keihins. You don't have to use both chokes if the bike starts okay using the left one which will be easier to reach. Mikunis are commonly bought as a pair of left-hand carbs, but a right-hand Mikuni can be bought if looked for when the purchase is made. If the bike is running decently once warm and you can sort out the idle mixture to your satisfaction, I wouldn't be concerned about it. The fuel petcock is designed to be used in the "On" position until the fuel level is below the height of that feed tube inside the tank, at which point the engine will start stuttering and you then switch it to "Reserve" and begin looking for a gas station. You should ALWAYS turn the fuel "Off" when the bike is parked to avoid fuel weeping past the float needles and into the top end of the engine when parked and past the top end into the bottom end, contaminating the oil which can cause major engine damage if run with oil thinned by fuel. Check the oil in the engine by putting the bike on the centerstand and putting the dipstick into the case, but not screwing it in, for proper oil level. You should take the info from the Clymer manual with a grain of salt... they tend to be incorrect often and can mislead. Someone here has a downloadable FSM (Factory Service Manual) and if no one offers, you can look around the site or post in the Manuals section to find one, they are properly accurate as to specs and adjustment settings.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you!

Your bike has 2 choke levers because it has Mikuni carbs on it, not the original Keihins. You don't have to use both chokes if the bike starts okay using the left one which will be easier to reach. Mikunis are commonly bought as a pair of left-hand carbs, but a right-hand Mikuni can be bought if looked for when the purchase is made. If the bike is running decently once warm and you can sort out the idle mixture to your satisfaction, I wouldn't be concerned about it. The fuel petcock is designed to be used in the "On" position until the fuel level is below the height of that feed tube inside the tank, at which point the engine will start stuttering and you then switch it to "Reserve" and begin looking for a gas station. You should ALWAYS turn the fuel "Off" when the bike is parked to avoid fuel weeping past the float needles and into the top end of the engine when parked and past the top end into the bottom end, contaminating the oil which can cause major engine damage if run with oil thinned by fuel. Check the oil in the engine by putting the bike on the centerstand and putting the dipstick into the case, but not screwing it in, for proper oil level. You should take the info from the Clymer manual with a grain of salt... they tend to be incorrect often and can mislead. Someone here has a downloadable FSM (Factory Service Manual) and if no one offers, you can look around the site or post in the Manuals section to find one, they are properly accurate as to specs and adjustment settings.
Tom -
Thank you so much for the advice and feedback. This is the exact kind of information that has been tricky to figure out online.
I will have to find a FSM to see how often to change the oil and how much (and what kind) to use.

Thanks again for the quick reply!
 
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