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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My head hurts.
Front tire is a 3.00-17 (4PR)
Rear tire is a 3.50-16 (4PR)

Guy at Revzilla Suggested some Avon AM26 Roadriders.
For the front he suggested 100/90-17 or 110/90-17 front or 110/80-17 on front.
For rear he suggested 130/80-16 or 120/80-16.

But looking at various charts and a few thread here shows the front ought to be more like J-T's Suggestion in another thread: 90/90 17 front and a 100/90 16 rear

Relevant threads:
Lecture on "oversize" tire sizes......
Wheel rim and Tire sizing - Important considerations


All said and done I'm having a heck of a poor time finding the right tires.

I did find some Duro HF319 on Amazon that are listed 3.00-17 and 3.50-16 But I can't find much for how they compare in terms of a review.

Given the comments in some of these threads. How much wiggle room is reasonable and where do I just get stubborn about precision?

Points to consider:
  • I'm a new rider.
  • I live out in the country where gravel on the roads is semi-normal. But I live close enough to a city of some 65,000 where concrete and potholes are everywhere.

And while I'm at it, how about a recommended tube brand?
 

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What are your rim sizes? They should be spelled out on the side wall of the rim hoop. Rim width is the factor that you need to consider most when choosing tires, too wide or narrow of a tire for any particular rim is bad news. Here's a chart lots of us refer to and refer others to:

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok, Good question.
Front is stamped: Araya Japan 1.60x17 14 96 --23 09-- J 17x1.60 7 78 DOT
Rear is stamped: D.I.D. Japan 1.85X16 16 96 --23 09-- J16x1.85 10 78 DOT


So... Hanged if I can understand that chart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok let me try again.

My front rim is stamped: Araya Japan 1.60x17 14 96 --23 09-- J 17x1.60 7 78 DOT
  • It's made in Japan by a company called Araya
  • the width of my rim is 1.60 inches
  • The diameter is 17 inches.
  • My rim happens to match the WM1 profile on that other post.
  • I have zero clue what the 14 96 means.
  • I have no clue what --23 09-- indicates either.
  • Nor can I guess what the J is for unless it's Japan.
  • I'll hazard a guess that the 7 78 is the rims' manufacturing date (July of 1978)
  • And the DOT (department of transportation) approved of the rim.


So staring at the chart, I can use any tire size (width/ratio) from
  • 2.25
  • 2.50
  • 2.75
  • 3.0
  • 3.10
  • 3.6
  • or 80/90

That doesn't make sense. Surely I'm reading that wrong. I mean why not a 3.25 or 3.5?

The 1.6 is listed under the WM1 column, so flipping back to the profile chart previously mentioned the max rim width is 2.4 inches on the outside so... I should do what with that information?



Now then, how bad have I bungled interpreting this?
 

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"So staring at the chart, I can use any tire size (width/ratio) from
2.25
2.50
2.75
3.0
3.10
3.6
or 80/90"

Yes, you are reading the chart correctly, the sizes not appropriate for your rim are because the first number (in metric tire sizes 80-90/17) is tire width, the second number is tire aspect (cross sectional height) expressed in a percentage.

Rim width is measured inside the rim where the tire bead goes, not external width.

I realize this is a partial explanation and may raise more questions, time is short at the moment, sorry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It definitely raises as many questions as it answers.
Hmm. So now I move to the rear tire with a 1.85 rim width and note that 2.75, 3.00, or 3.10 are STD (Standard!???) while the FSM says use a 3.50.
On this round, I'll just do that but how do I go about getting my head around the options in a way that makes sense?

Sorry if this is pedantic, but I like to understand things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Alright guys I'm down to either the Duro HF319's or the Shinko SR241's.

I'm concerned about the schinko's being louder. I won't be doing any off roading at all so, leaning towards the Duro's to be honest; but I just can't find any actual reviews on them.
 

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I think I've read some experiences here where some 350 owners have laced up new rims one step wider and have gotten much better performance out of the stock tire sizes. I guess Honda tailored the bikes for best cost and with the tire sizes expressed in inches, tires were a better fit than metric sized tires. (I think that was one conclusion)

I'll poke around for some tire reviews, hold my beer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Guess I should clarify. I found the Amazon reviews (that's where I'm buying) but the fortnine are new to me. Thanks for that!

I was hoping for something more than "it's black, it's round, and it works." < A literal review I read.
 

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Guess I should clarify. I found the Amazon reviews (that's where I'm buying) but the fortnine are new to me. Thanks for that!

I was hoping for something more than "it's black, it's round, and it works." < A literal review I read.
LMAO, better than "it's black, round and holds air."
 

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Give me my 'beer' back, aw it's warm now... I was trying (between working and waiting, an oxymoronic software based hardware upgrade) to find reviews from an independent source and not a retail outlet, and came up empty. I was hoping for some kind of magazine shootout but these tires are a little outside their scope these days.

If anyone in the States is interested I did find this tire at Revzilla for $33.96 (free shipping starts at $39.99)

https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/duro-hf319-tires

edit: it's only the 3.00x18 size, bummer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for trying Alan! I'll do my best to post a barely better than amateur review when I get them ordered. We're quickly running out of of riding weather in the midwest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just a pointed update. I finally got around to ordering these tires from Amazon and they've shown up! I've never done my own tires though, so I found a shop near me that will do them for me. I'll hope to have them over there this week. He's going to do my brakes as well (new shoes) so I'm pretty stoked. Once I lube my cables, all I need to gasoline.
Riding weather in 3...2....1...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for trying Alan! I'll do my best to post a barely better than amateur review when I get them ordered. We're quickly running out of of riding weather in the midwest.
As promised I said I would try to do a completely amateur review of these tires.

Manufacture.
These are Duro Tire HF319. The Duro catalog describes them having a "Traditional pattern and traditional styling for vintage motorcycles." They are suitable for both front and rear, and they were one of the very few makers out there I could find a match set for my 1978 Honda CM185.

These are 4 Ply with a service index of 52P (441 pounds, 93 MPH) in the rear and 45P (364 pounds, 93 MPH) in the front. They were happy replacements for my former pair which were extremely old (no date stamp on them), cracked, and speed rated for 45 mph.

Appearance.
Let's start with appearance because I'm more qualified to say something about that than anything else. I say this because I have eyes and opinions, not because I'm educated in tire aesthetics. I'm not, but I know what I like.
Overall these look about perfect on my vintage bike - Duro did well with a reticulating pattern that looks both classic and functional. The height profile fits the bike very well, and the tread pattern itself does not look out of place on my CM185.

Durability.
I wish I could weigh in on this right now, I can't because they're still rather new. Hopefully, after I've put miles on them I'll be able to talk about how they aged. Keep in mind that a large number of miles will not be highway, but will instead be on country roads which are glazed with road tar and large gravel all pressed together. This gives the roads the heat of asphalt and the abrasion of gravel - it's truly the best of both worlds.

Grip.
The tires are still new, and I'm a pretty inexperienced rider - so I'm not banking into high speed turns like a motocross rider. That said, I feel stable in my turns and there's no real sign of slippage that I can tell. The treads themselves lend themselves quite well to gripping the glazed roads I describe above, and they appear to channel small left over puddles pretty well. I'm still a riding coward, and I like it that way, so don't go looking for splash testing here.

Sound.
Somewhere out there on the interweb someone worried about this pattern buzzing. I don't hear anything at all beyond the wind, and I don't feel any vibrational instability either.

Conclusion.
Without years of riding experience all I can say is that I like these tires. First off they fit the bike which is where I had to start. But they were a solid low budget solution that, at least for now, look like a repeat purchase once I've worn them out.
 
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