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1976 CB360T
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend gave me this 1976 CB360T after it had been sitting idle in his garage for nearly 10 years. It's my first motorcycle.
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The only obvious cosmetic changes from factory are the handlebars and the rear taillamp. It is also missing a seat. Other than repairing whatever is required to get it running, there really isn't much damage to it except a cracked headlamp housing and busted left turn signal.
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First thing I did: After changing the oil and cleaning the "oil filter", I attempted to clean the carbs (first time ever touching one) which included full disassembly, soaking in carb cleaner, cleaning the jets, and replacing all the o-rings.
Random pics before cleaning:
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Afterwards, though, it was obvious I did something improperly - I'm guessing the float heights were not set right. I could not get gas to flow into either of them.
I also bought a fully disassembled 1974 CB360 which I intend to build - rather than use as a parts bin - after I get the '76 revived. But for now I borrowed its freshly-rebuilt factory carbs to confirm that the original carbs I attempted to rebuild still need to be done properly. :( They are trickier than I thought.
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And after flushing the gas tank, cleaning the petcock, replacing the fuel lines, and putting fresh gas, I got the bike to start and run - rough, and only on one cylinder :( Currently troubleshooting no spark to the left cylinder.

Again, I was able to use my 'extra bike' to confirm that the missing spark is likely an issue at the points, which I plan to troubleshoot soon. Just waiting on a proper impact driver to remove the alternator cover, whose bolts are totally seized. I already had to drill and extract the points cover screws and want to avoid it again if I don't need to.

While waiting for some better tools for the engine troubleshooting, decided to tackle the front brake, which I'll continue in the next post.
 

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1976 CB360T
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6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I do have a couple questions. First: I expect the brake lines to be corroded, damaged, and worn. I plan to replace pretty much everything, and with the upper brake line I see this strain right after the master cylinder where there is excessive cracking and wonder if this routing is normal or should I plan on doing it differently? I see the length of this line is 15" and there are other options (13") that seem intended for bikes with lower handle bars. Anyone have experience?
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I'll probably replace everything here except the caliper. Even with the big chuck taken out of it, I think I can get away with just cleaning and repainting.
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Also, any tips to getting the pad out of the caliper housing without a functioning master cylinder to push it out?
 
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