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Discussion Starter #1
Here's my baby, my first bike ever. She's treated me very well since I got her in July, been riding just about every other day and put over 1k miles already. I picked her up from a CL find, $650 but no title. Luckily Texas has a simple process for a bonded title that I'm about to go through.

This was taken after a month or so of having her- I removed the crusty air boxes and bought some UNI foam ones. These pics don't have the UNIs on.





 

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First things first, I ordered new tires. Mine were cracked and dry, and very dangerous. I got some Bridgestone Battlax tires from Cycle Gear. Had to learn how to remove my wheels, also had to buy a motorcycle jack :)



Also at this time, I was waiting for my replacement mirrors and torpedo mufflers. The idea for this bike is to be a semi-restoration. I will make it look like any modifications were performed in the 70's using available parts. Of course I intend to upgrade the electronics significantly, including relays for the headlight and coils, upgrading the charging system, etc. I may also go with an upgraded ignition system and am thinking of a homemade battery to save some space.

If you guys only knew how close I was to chopping this beauty up- before I got sense in my head. Finding this forum gave me appreciation for the dorky taillight and blinkers, etc :)
 

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Behind the scenes: The headlights and blinkers didn't work when I got the bike. The electric starter works, but the button is missing. This turned out to be the reason the headlights didn't work- when you push the electric starter, it temporarily toggles the headlight off to save juice. With no button, there's no toggle :) So for now, I just soldered the two wires together to keep headlights on at all times. When I get a starter button I'll rectify the situation.

The blinkers were no problem, just picked up a cheap generic 12v thermal flasher relay and wired it up in place of the old one. One step closer to legal and much safer.

I noticed that my gas tank cap was missing its rubber seal, so I ordered and installed one. Instantly my bike refused to run for more than 10 seconds! I traced it to the gas cap vent being clogged- poked it out and everything was fine.

This was all in the first few days... more to come.
 

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Being completely new to bikes (and engines in general) I was pretty lost. I've done a lot of reading here and elsewhere.I started by reading this great thread, Evaluating Old Honda Twins - Six Easy Steps.

I ordered the original Honda manual and the Clymer manual for my bike and started getting some tools I'd need.Changed the oil and found it pretty clean and not smelling of fuel. Picked up a new battery.

I did not run compression tests- I really need to meet up with Mike N. and take him up on his offer to check compression!! Been busy and I know he has too.

I tried to do the cam chain tension adjustment, unfortunately was not skilled enough to know if I'm doing it quite right. I mean I followed the steps, but nothing obvious happened. Also checking the valve clearance, my experience prevented me from really knowing where to measure. I am going to go back this weekend and try again, knowing a little better where to measure this time.

Started to do the timing, but my points plate was locked in place by stubborn screws. Ordered an impact driver from Harbor Freight to get those out.

Played with the fuel/air mix on my carbs and it actually runs better than it did when I got it. For a little while, I had gas pouring out of both carb overflow tubes. I used the screwdriver-knocking-method to make them stop leaking, ran some Marvel Mystery Oil through the gas, put inline fuel filters in place, and things improved! Still getting some backfire on the left side and can't open the throttle all the way- around 7k RPM, the left side cuts out and obviously I lose power. If I roll the throttle carefully under 6k I can accelerate up to around 85 MPH on a flat highway with wind at my back ;)

I've bled the front brake, and there is plenty of brake pad left, but the piston doesn't return to its position so I have squeakiness. I am taking Rod up on his offer of a stainless steel brake piston as noted here, and will install that when it comes in.

I notice my bike shakes at speeds over 70- not much, but a little shimmy. I wonder if my back tire is not aligned quite right to the swingarm (the wheel itself was balanced when I bought new tires). How do you check that, without eyeballing it?
 

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The easiest way I've found to check the rear wheel alignment is to measure the distance between the center of the swingarm pivot and the center of the axle. They should both match...Set your chain tension, then work the adjusters to get the distances equal...recheck chain, adjust, recheck distance. that will get you close. other things that can cause shakes are the steering head bearings and the swingarm bushings. Check for play in the steering head...should be none. Also check that the steering isn't notchy. either issue is bad, ajdust or replace if necessary. check that there is no side to side play in the swingarm. If there is, swingarm bushings need to be replaced...no way to adjust.
 

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Bone said:
I notice my bike shakes at speeds over 70- not much, but a little shimmy. I wonder if my back tire is not aligned quite right to the swingarm (the wheel itself was balanced when I bought new tires). How do you check that, without eyeballing it?
I've hit 70, but not more. It happened a couple times before I noticed the bike quietly snickering to herself.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That's weird, this bike is rock solid and didn't even shimmy until I changed the tires ;)

I may have one of the rare 360s that isn't a pain in the ass! In fact it took both myself and my girlfriend out on the highway at 70-75 MPH without complaining.
 

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Chuckwagon said:
The easiest way I've found to check the rear wheel alignment is to measure the distance between the center of the swingarm pivot and the center of the axle. They should both match...Set your chain tension, then work the adjusters to get the distances equal...recheck chain, adjust, recheck distance. that will get you close. other things that can cause shakes are the steering head bearings and the swingarm bushings. Check for play in the steering head...should be none. Also check that the steering isn't notchy. either issue is bad, ajdust or replace if necessary. check that there is no side to side play in the swingarm. If there is, swingarm bushings need to be replaced...no way to adjust.
Duh, what a simple idea I completely overlooked (measuring swingarm center to axle center)! :)

I've checked for play in the swingarm, it's good but I intend to buy some of those aftermarket bronze bushings so I can write that repair off for the life of the bike. I haven't checked the steering head, but I read somewhere that high-speed shakes are symptomatic of rear wheel problems, while low-speed shakes are almost always front wheel problems. Thanks for the insight though!
 

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Never heard that advice on high speed vs. low speed wobbles, but you should check the head bearings regardless. a tank slapper (handlebars going lock to lock in rapid succession) will spoil your day and your boxers. it is very easy to check, yet often overlooked, but critical. when the bike is on your work stand(or centerstand with somone pushing down on the rear of the seat to lift the front wheel), push and pull on the forks. if you feel any shifting, the head's too loose. next turn the wheel halfway to the stop. remove your hands...the wheel should flop to the stop by its own weight. also see if you can feel any resistace to turning. if you do, means head's too tight or bearings/races are bad. if they need replacing, it is a little involved, but not bad. forget all those ball bearings that rolled all over your garage floor...you should replace with a set of tapered cage bearings (all balls sells sets for about $40 that fit well). I tried to save some dough and went with a cheap-o set from ebay that didn't fit properly...so now I have the hassle of sending them back. Properly set/new head bearings can make a world of difference in handling. Ok, done preaching, just don't want you to end your motorcycling career early ;)

So where are you planning to get bronze bushings for your 360...I'd like to get a set for my tree-fiddy?

My 350 doesn't complain at 75, just howls and gets really close to redline...thinking of a sprocket change so I don't stress it out. seems my bike is happiest between 6000 and 8000 rpms, though.
 

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Chuckwagon said:
So where are you planning to get bronze bushings for your 360...I'd like to get a set for my tree-fiddy?
Different parts entirely.
There's a lengthy discussion here - http://www.hondatwins.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=29&t=320

The high-peed/low-speed wobble thing is BS.
All geometry problems are expressed in the front end, because it moves easily.
Any "wobble" speed is not a function of which wheel is involved, it's way more complicated than that.
 

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So...I checked into the thread on swingarm bushings...thanks for the link, Bill. 350's do use different bushings, and the CBX guy (Bob) doesn't have any that will fit as far as I can tell from the part #s he provided to me through direct e-mail.

I don't want to hijack this thread, so I'll start my own thread in search of an answer on how to find something similar for a 350.
 

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Chuckwagon said:
So...I checked into the thread on swingarm bushings...thanks for the link, Bill. 350's do use different bushings, and the CBX guy (Bob) doesn't have any that will fit as far as I can tell from the part #s he provided to me through direct e-mail.

I don't want to hijack this thread, so I'll start my own thread in search of an answer on how to find something similar for a 350.

I spoke with Bob about this some time ago - he would need about 20-30 "orders" to make it worth his while, as the 350 part is unique.
He had originally made them for his CBX, then discovered that they fit a whole bunch of different models.
Sadly, not so with the 350........
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Unsurprisingly I stand corrected on both points. I picked up the high-speed/low-speed wobble theory from another similar forum and will not further re misinformation.
Thanks for being a great source of info, guys.
 

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Bone said:
Unsurprisingly I stand corrected on both points. I picked up the high-speed/low-speed wobble theory from another similar forum and will not further re misinformation.
Thanks for being a great source of info, guys.
Sorry Bone -

I wasn't trying to slap you down or anything, just trying to keep you from wasting time/money chasing your tail.

Swingarm is the major suspect, and what should be checked first.........
 

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Discussion Starter #15
tbpmusic said:
Bone said:
Unsurprisingly I stand corrected on both points. I picked up the high-speed/low-speed wobble theory from another similar forum and will not further re misinformation.
Thanks for being a great source of info, guys.
Sorry Bone -

I wasn't trying to slap you down or anything, just trying to keep you from wasting time/money chasing your tail.

Swingarm is the major suspect, and what should be checked first.........
I don't feel slapped down, I am an admitted newb and you should not feel bad for correcting information that is here for the permanent record ;)

Just to be clear though- on that bronze swingarm bushing thread, you mentioned "360's also list the flanged 457 part- this part was probably steel originally." Does this mean that the bronze swingarm bushing (with included flange) is a suitable replacement for the 360? My brain hurts from reading that thread. Thanks brother.

EDIT: Visited their site http://cbxperformance.com/oscommerce/pr ... e497a77fbf and indeed it says the following:

"These bronze swing arm bushings will also fit many other Honda motorcycles of the 70's vintage per below: CB450K6/K7 (or any 5-speed CB450), CB750 K-series, CB360, CB500T, CB400F, CB500/550, etc. Direct interchange with Honda part #'s 52109-283-300, 52108-300-300, 52108-457-300."

Not for the 350, but it sounds like my 360 may greatly benefit :)
 

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tbpmusic said:
Yeah, same part on the 360 - not the 350 though.
Replace them with bronze once and it's done pretty much forever.
Damn, I'm jealous. :cry:
 

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I'm not sure if Hondaman still offers this service but it'd be worth emailing him to see what his prices are if he does..

by: HondaMan on June 07, 2009, 11:40:39 am
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I offer the full rebuild service on these swingarms (all vintage Honda arms) now. It consists of custom-fitted 841 Oilite Bronze bushings, made on my lathe, and custom-aligned bore centers to match the collar (or new collar) to those bushings after installation. A full rebuild gets the Lifetime Warranty, a partial rebuild gets a 50,000 mile warranty. These warranties are for 100% replacement, if anything goes wrong with my work, or if it wears out in that time. You just have to grease it on schedule. The Oilite will forgive you if you are a little late, like on a long touring ride, and won't damage anything.

I started doing this in late 2006 because Honda has changed their replacement parts to inferior parts, for whatever reason. Their bushings are now made of pressed steel, and since the collars are hardened steel, this wears very quickly: most arms I get for rebuild have these parts inside and have worn or rusted to lockup in 5000 miles or so. It is simply not possible to lubricate steel-on-steel: any lubrication manual will tell you so. :-\

The collar for the "F" arms and CB750K5-later arms is not available from Honda anymore, but the older style collar is: I am also beginning to make collars in case Honda stops theirs. I 'convert' these "F" and late K arms to the earlier design during rebuild, which includes the original grease seals that worked and end cap spacers (Honda calls these a "bush" now) that accurately center the arm in the frame. I am just now beginning to make bronze versions of these end caps, too, for the more performance-oriented rider.

I highly recommend the installation of the earlier style swingarm bolt, which has grease zerks on both ends, with American zerks installed (I do those, too). This will ensure perfect lube action in 5 minutes total time, from the sides of the bike, instead of by standing on your head under the swingarm to get at the center fitting. This bolt is required (at this time) for the Lifetime Warranty because the center-zerk arrangement does a poor job of delivering any lube to the ends of the collar. The center-zerk can work, if you use the RIGHT grease and lube it exactly the RIGHT way, but it can take 30 minutes to do this task, so few do. Without this older style bolt, the warranty must be 50,000 miles on the "F" and later K arms.

I can also replace those shock bushings: they go out toward the inside of the arm, in from the inside, too. The holes in the arm are tapered .0012" from the factory. Use a pair of 3/8" drive sockets, one large, one small to fit the OD of the old bushing. Install a 5/16" grade 8 bolt and lots of washers and pull the old ones out, press the new ones in. Use lots of penetrating oil on the way out, grease on the way in. ;)

I don't make and sell just bushings, because the tube on the swingarms is usually oval and/or flared toward the outside from years of riding stresses, so the bushings must be tapered or oval to match on the OD. This is what generates the need for the final bore alignment procedure I use to make a perfect fit. It is simple for a manufacturer to make a bronze bushing with an oversized center hole so the collar will still fit after such a tortured installation, but it will leave side-to-side motion at the rear axle even after all your hard installation work, or within 1000 miles thereafter. You won't find that with my rebuilds, guaranteed. :)

A few $$ from the work goes back to SOHC4.net for support. If you'd like more info, contact me at my e-mail: [email protected]


GB :mrgreen:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Just ordered a pair of bushings from Bob! Club price got them shipped to me for $37.45 (less than the base price minus shipping on his site!). Thanks, HondaTwins :)
 

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Just a quickie...hows the front axle clamps and nuts? You say the problem came about after a tyre change? While I agree that swingarm bushings and steering bearings are the obvious suspects...is the front axle correctly clamped?

1. Are the four 8mm flange nuts tight?
2. The forward clamp nut should be torqued down first, then the rear side (which doesnt clamp down flush..theres a slight gap even when at torque spec).
3. Is there any noticeable warp in the front rim? You would hope not if the wheel had been serviced, but ya never know what some crack smokin work apprentice kid might've let go.
4. A long shot...but are the forks seated evenly both sides of the top tree? Are the fork pinch bolts torqued proper. FYI if you go adjusting the pinch bolts, do the lower ones first..or you'll break one of gods rarest creations.
5. I'm just brain storming alone with my beer here, but maybe fork oil isnt equal in both tubes?

These are a few simple and free checks you can perform while you wait for your parts to arrive. BTW I got my roller steering bearings on ebay (as well as fork oil seals) from Pyramid Parts, and the free shipping to Australia was a first :eek: :eek:

Good luck bro! You're one of the chosen few that actually ride their 360 :mrgreen:
 
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