Honda Twins banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Hi 75CB, Kudos for trying to tackle the fork seal replacement. I replaced the seals on my ‘76 CJ360, but only after watching as many videos that I could locate. There are a couple available from Common Motor and they will help you identify the correct replacement seals and the quirky way the suspension components are held together (there’s a special bolt that comes up from the bottom of the lower fork body).

One of the hardest steps is getting the old seals out without badly marring the aluminum body where each is set. The original Honda seals were firmly driven in place at the factory. I couldn’t get my old ones to budge by prying with a large flathead screwdriver, which is one method that is supposed to work. I had success with a medium crescent wrench by opening it up enough to get one of the faces under the lip of the seal and then pushing down on the handle. The head of the wrench (which is rounded) pressed against the other side of the fork body which provided enough leverage to get part of the seal to budge.

I definitely would not ride the bike without oil in the fork tubes. It’s a pretty easy job to drain and refill them, and automatic transmission fluid can be used (cheaper than specialty fork oil which can be used after installing new seals). BUT unless you’ve got a motorcycle operator license AND are a skilled enough rider to tell if your forks are working properly in spite of bad seals, I do not recommend riding it. Your bike has 47 years of wear and tear, but it’s also unfamiliar to you. At most, take short and slow ”shake down” rides. You need to learn how strong and reliable the brakes are, how reliable is the motor, does the reserve setting on the fuel petcock work, do the wheels vibrate excessively, how powerful is the headlight, etc., etc. You also need to read up on how gasoline that contains ethanol can clog the carburetor on an old motorcycles. That kind of gas wasn’t around in 1976 and the carbs weren’t designed for it.
Hope you enjoy many years of safe riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I agree with Polaris about using conventional fork seals. I installed the EZ seals and one seems to be functioning perfectly but the other let’s a minor amount of fork oil seep by. The major advantage of the EZ seals is ease of removal, but high-quality conventional seals ought to last for a long time.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top