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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to do a little maintenance/cleaning of my carbs on my CL350. No big deal, these are pretty simple. What I am thinking will be a pain is gaining access to them. Do I need to remove the exhaust or can I simply loosen some strategic fasteners?

Regarding my coils, as I was trying to get the bike started the other night for the first time this season, I was checking for spark using a screwdriver and noticed a few things. FWIW, battery is freshly charged and starter was spinning fast...
1. the spark was small and weak looking
2. upon removing the plug wires ends, I saw that the plug wires themselves (ends) were fairly discolored. Can these be replaced without replacing the coils?
3. are there alternatives to original coils?
4. a recommended electronic ignition?

Thanks all! This is a great place for bikes like mine!
 

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Generally you have to pull off the exhaust to do just about anything to a CL.
Plug wires can't be replaced easily on stock coils.
There are numerous posts about coils here - do a Search.

Please edit your Profile to display your year/model, location, and real name if you want anyone to bother helping you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
tbpmusic said:
Please edit your Profile to display your year/model, location, and real name if you want anyone to bother helping you.
I did some of that just now, thanks for the heads-up. But I did not see where to display my real name...

Oops, I get it!
 

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Being another new guy here, I'll pick up the slack and hit the slow pitches

1) check your points for arcing. The condensors might be bad. File the points to clean them.

2) the plug wires cannot be pulled out of the coils and are not serviceable. You have to work with what you got. Spray some electrical contact cleaner on them to clean them up. and then screw the caps back in.

3) There are always alternatives. It's just an ignition coil. You could put two 12v ignition coils from a car on the motorcycle if you wanted. A lot of people look for the XS650 coils being sold on mikesxs.net and claim to have good results. The nice thing about XS650 coils is that you can remove the plug wires and put in whatever kind you like.

4) I have no idea about electronic ignition for the CB350. There are only two cylinders and points ignition is not as scary as everyone makes it out to be. In fact, it's pretty simple. Getting a grasp on how it works and how to adjust it will save you a lot of money and frustration down the road for all of your vintage bike (and car) endeavors.
 

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tbpmusic said:
Please edit your Profile to display your year/model, location, and real name if you want anyone to bother helping you.

*EDIT* yes, please do. It helps speed things along.
 

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In the time it took you to type all of that out, you could've updated your signature to include all 15 or 16 bikes that you've owned. :roll: There's an old saying that goes something like "if you don't have anything nice to say, then don't say anything at all." If you've got an issue with a policy/preference on this site then feel free to PM a moderator or the site administrator with your concerns.

The mods want everyone to do this because it simplifies life for us all here. It makes answering questions much quicker because we don't have to ask what bike they're talking about. Not everyone remembers to include their bike model in with the question or problems they're having. It happens all the time here.


GB :mrgreen:
 

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*EDIT* sorry. re-hash of 1st post
 

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We're not asking for a list of all bikes anyone may own Kirk. We're asking people to list bikes that they're HERE for. This is the Honda TWINS. So listing your CB900 or ABCD1000 isn't important. Through past experience it's easy to tell that members new and old alike easily forget to list what bike they're speaking of. Happens all the time here. It still simplifies things for us all and leads to quicker answers for people posting questions. It's not a perfect system but it sure beats what was going on before it was thought up.

I'll say it again, if you have something to complain about then keep it private and through PM's please. :)


GB :mrgreen:
 

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*EDIT* - sorry, rehash of 1st post
 

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luketrash said:
2) the plug wires cannot be pulled out of the coils and are not serviceable. You have to work with what you got. Spray some electrical contact cleaner on them to clean them up. and then screw the caps back in.
I once read a thread on a Kawasaki twins forum where the moderator DID pull out the wires from a "molded core" coil. He carefully sliced the coil 'bulge' where the plug wires fit, was able to remove the molded-in factory wire which turned out to just press onto a 'nail' down inside, was able to install brand new generic plug wires and epoxy it all back together. It worked perfectly for him, and other than a lot of fussy work, it was virtually free. Just another tool in the toolbox. But, as Bill originally mentioned, it's not easy; that is, it's not a "routine" job.

luketrash said:
3) There are always alternatives. It's just an ignition coil. You could put two 12v ignition coils from a car on the motorcycle if you wanted. A lot of people look for the XS650 coils being sold on mikesxs.net and claim to have good results. The nice thing about XS650 coils is that you can remove the plug wires and put in whatever kind you like..
+1. I've used generic automotive coils once, as a test. Ugly, but works.


luketrash said:
4) I have no idea about electronic ignition for the CB350. There are only two cylinders and points ignition is not as scary as everyone makes it out to be. In fact, it's pretty simple. Getting a grasp on how it works and how to adjust it will save you a lot of money and frustration down the road for all of your vintage bike (and car) endeavors.
+1. Points ignitions are very simple, if you just have a "garden hose" knowledge of electricity (current is water flow, voltage is water pressure, current must flow from (+) all the way back to (-), one way or the other.

Good luck, and enjoy the process!

Kirk
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I only had an hour to work on it last night and this is what I got done:

1. Removed the exhaust, air cleaners and carbs
2. on one carb, removed chrome top and float bowl

Here is what I found so far:

1. plier marks on the jets, very light though
2. very clean carbs, inside and out
3. unexpected little windows in the choke butterflies with swinging covers
4. the one diaphragm I looked at was good
5. the one set of bowl floats were dry (good soldering) thank goodness
6. the choke butterfly in the right carb had the screws loose :shock: I need to tighten them and stake them properly (any idea how to do that?)
7. oh, and the air cleaner elements were filthy! what have you all found to be the best way to clean them?
8. oh yeah, left carb manifold boot clamp was loose, probably causing a lean condition on that side all last summer
9. Generally, all of the gaskets and sealing surfaces seem to be fresh and new-ish.

And lastly and sadly, I found the battery vent hose not connected ad when I removed the air cleaner, the front of the rear fender was showing a lot of dissolved chrome, showing some nickle and copper undercoats from vented acid dripping down. Dang! :(

Today I will only have time to get back intot he garage and properly label and bag up all of the parts and screws scattered all over the place before someone steps in and kicks things hither and yon.

Hopefully, I just needed to get in there and spray some carb cleaner into the jets and make some adjustments, and then only worry about spark and timing and get it back on the road. It ran pretty good all last year after I bought it on Father's Day, but it was always kind of hard to start too. By mid summer it was easier to use the kick starter because the elctric one needed to go too long and I was concerned about working it too hard.

Thanks for the encouragement folks! I'll get some pics up too soon. It is painted wrong for a '73 but it looks nice and the tank is super clean on the inside.
 

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Here's a photo of one of the carbs I went through and cleaned up last Friday.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4070/462 ... 2ebe_b.jpg

You can see all of the parts removed, polished, and with new rubber o-rings installed on the jets and needle seat. This way you know what you're up against in terms of individual parts. I had plier marks on another set of jets from different carbs. Use a flathead screwdriver to pry up that spring retainer rather than pliers to pull em out. Spray silicone on them to soften the old rubber o-rings.

Those stupid tiny rubber o-rings cost me an arm and a leg. I had to use grease to fit them back into the carb body.

However, I did them right, and the bike fired off on the first kick thanks to my whole afternoon spent going through these things and giving them a lot of attention.

These carburetors are simple. The only thing I hate about them is that the seat and jets are spring retained and use o-rings rather than threaded like they should be ;)

I cleaned out all of the pilot jet holes (and other holes) with piano wire. That is what will pay off the most probably since they're the circuits that plug up the easiest.

A lot of carb cleaner, and NevrDull to polish the brass stuff as well as the slide seemed to do the trick.
 
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