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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New to this forum and also to bikes, but not to carbs or wrenches.

After enjoying a few great beers last year, a cousin mentioned that a '73 CB350 had been sitting in a basement, unloved, for 20 years. I thought nothing of it until I popped my ACL this spring. No skiing and no golf meant that I had a hole to fill, and with my oldest son coming back home (and having no experience of the joys of wrenches, and gas - but definitely having a good grasp on beer) I figured it was my destiny to restore the bike with him.

So here I am. I have about 90 pics taken so far, and if I can figure how to download them to this log I will do so. In the meantime, I am down to taking the carbs off, and I can't believe that what I just did is correct...but the left carb is off....

I am impressed with the knowledge of readers, having read other logs, so all comments will be appreciated.

aha...this might be a start with this pic. It's not where I am, but it is where I hope to be going
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
So, given that I figured out the pic thing, here is a picture of the carb with its collar attached. I have to believe that there is an easier way to pull the carb rather than take out the two screws that hold it to the intake side of the head.

Any suggestions?
 

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Welcome to the site.
Nice picture gives you something to aim for.
All the information you could possibly wish for (and some you didn't want to know) is available here.
good luck
 

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You should be able to pull the carbs without taking the intake boot off. I've never needed to take them off. Did you have both clamps removed? Meaning the clamp on the intake boot and one on the air filter side. Looking at the picture, looks like the intake boot clamp is still on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, folks. I will certainly appreciate the help as I strip the bike in prep to sand blast the frame.

The intake boot clamp was still on it, HerrDeacon. I removed the clamp after detaching the boot and carb from the head. The boot will twist, but doesn't seem to want to separate now. Perhaps I just need more force on it.

The next tricky step seems to be disconnecting the clutch cable. I unhooked it at the hand grip to give me some wiggle room, and am taking the cover off now.
 

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Yes, those two are different lengths, but both should be available at your local hardware store if any of them get stripped out. Be sure to use anti-seize when putting everything back together. If you ever tear into the engine, or if you get a bee in your bonnet, it might be helpful to replace those with a stainless steel alan bolt set. Less likely to stick or strip.

Be sure to find the shop manual for that thing. It's here somewhere.

Good luck on the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the anti-seize tip, Indie. I was talking with the fellow at the hardware store about it, and discussing whether to use LockTite or anti-seize. I think brake and engine components will be anti-seize.

I did find the manual via this site before starting. Good thing, too, because I am not sure if I'd have noticed the right frame component being lower than the left - and hence the side to pull the engine out on. Even then, and despite my best intention to make it as easy as possible, I ended up having to manhandle the engine out. The top of the head was touching the bottom of the cross brace, the starter was nudging the frame front and the engine had not cleared the rear brackets. I had to rock it and twist it as each nut on the head cleared..whew!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Down to pulling the rear wheel, the front assembly, and lastly the swing arm off. This rear axle is not coming quietly, however, and you can see my smithing hammer there. First time that I have resorted to it on this bike. Anyone know a smarter way to remove the rear axle?
 

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On my CB350 K3 the rear axle took a little coaxing to get out. On the parts bike I am using, it took some brute force with a hammer. On the tear down, I coated almost everything in penetrating oil over and over again. Doesn't matter if it gets everywhere, as you will want to clean when its apart anyway. I see you have something through the other side of axle- I did the same, using a screwdriver stuck through the hole to twist between hits. Make sure there is no weight on the wheel itself. I put mine on the center stand and put a piece of wood under the wheel to make sure that it wouldn't drop when the axle came out. Usually the best thing to do is tap lightly and twist- if you are experiencing a lot of resistance/it won't budge, check to make sure nothing is in the way (ie the rear axle nut pin, some other part, lots of dirt, grime, etc), and keep trying. If its like mine, it resists a lot in the first couple of inches, but then practically slides out.
If you don't have one, get an impact driver (the hand held kind that you hammer on, I got mine at O'reilly auto store). It will save you a lot of time and stripped screws. A small propane torch may also be useful. Both are very cheap.
Good luck
-Mike
 

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also, in terms of removing and installing the engine, I take the top left four nuts off when installing and leave them off until I get the engine back in the frame. The extra centimeter of clearance makes a huge difference, especially when you're doing it yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks, Mike. Those are welcomed suggestions. There is no weight on the rear tire - the wood underneath is to try and keep it straight now that it's off the left arm. I'll shoot some more WD40 onto the axle.

The suggestion about removing the top left nuts when putting the motor back in is terrific! Do you then re-torque all of them when re-installing?

Bob
 

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Yes, you would want to loosely have the other four nuts on, and once you've got it in the frame re-torque them in the x pattern (says how in most manuals). Be careful though, as those nuts help hold the engine together, so be wary of only holding onto the head. Try to do most of the menuvering by holding onto the bottom of the engine. When I did the engine install I didn't have any (competent) help, but it seemed to work for me.
Also, remove the starter motor and put it back on after the motor is back in the frame.
Once I got the engine loosely in the frame, it helped a lot to put a jack beneath the engine (my civic tire jack worked awesome... hondas helping hondas) so I could get it sitting exactly right such that the screws that secure it to the frame went in easily. If you do this and you have just painted your frame, wrap the frame with tape/plastic/old rags, etc or you'll have lots of scratches on your new paint job (like I did).
If you do decide to strip and paint the frame, I would suggest not using rust-oleum. It takes way too long to cure (months) and is susceptible to fingernail scratches until then. I don't know how much powder coating costs, but thats one of the things I wish I would have done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well, it's all stripped down now, and I've been debating whether to go with a powdercoat or rattle can on the frame. I've got a variety of tools and the paint already, but I wonder if it would be smarter to go with the powdercoat instead...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I have now had a hard look at the bike with the components removed. There is rust at most of the spot welds and in a variety of other places on the frame, stand, wheels, fenders, and forks - some of it heavy. I'm not fussed since the bike was the donation of a very generous cousin, but realize that it's going to be a knock-around bike and something of a practice run since it will be my first-ever motorcycle project. Considering this, and after taking a sharp pencil to my budget, I've decided to do the frame myself (versus powder coating).

I've spent about 5 hours removing paint from the frame using a 6" wire wheel and a course stripping wheel on my 1/2 drill, a Dremel tool w sanding wheel, and sand paper. Most of the rust is gone or scraped down. I figure another 3 hours and everything (that I can reach) will be scuffed and reading for cleaning and then a coating of some sort. I'm going to spot treat the rust spots (post brushing/sanding) with rust treatment (I have Locktite's Extend and NAPA's spray on rust treatment), then apply Dupli-Color self etching primer followed by a high-build primer to the whole bike. Still thinking of whether or not to sneak some Chassis Saver on top of this, and then a top coat and clear coat.

Any suggestions?
 

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Nice work. Good choice on the duplicolor. Its quality stuff. When I did this, it was really rewarding to get the frame to raw metal and then spray on a nice shiny coat of paint. Be careful of inside corners and edges- they tend to accumulate paint and you can get sags.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Research, check. Paint, check. Fans, check. Lights.....Lights.... ooops. After using a spray Rust Inhibitor from NAPA, the Duplicolor self-etching primer looked great. I waited an hour, and then applied Krylon's black Rust Tough as my next topcoat. It looked great, but I failed to have enough lighting. What I thought was the primer showing through actually ended up being a reflection..and adding more paint to that area means that I'm now looking at a sag on the downbar. Still pleased at the results, however. Another color coat, and then a couple of clear coats should do it before I let it cure. Better lighting next time.
 

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You can let the paint cure and block sand it to get the sag out. Use something 600 or higher, go light and you'll take care of it in no time. Adding more paint tends to highlight it (especially gloss clear coats) rather than cover it up. Just my two cents. I don't have much experience with automotive paint, but I know my way around guitar lacquer (which can be pretty unforgiving).
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks. I was going to just let it go, but after looking at it again this morning, my OCD won't let me...I can work it into my next topcoat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
While I know that my motor ran before the bike was stored in a dirt-floored cellar for a decade, I am unsure of its condition now. My plan is to turn it over by hand and take some compression readings to check on the rings, etc. The carbs are still off, new oil in the sump, valves will be set and both plugs will be out. I could buy a new battery now and run it off the starter, but my first thought is to use a ratchet or 1/2" drill with a socket. Is there a minimum crank speed to get usable readings?

Secondly, I wonder if I should replace the cam chain and tensioner now while the motor is out, rather than waiting for the inevitable futrure failure. There are 5,743 actual miles on the bike.
 
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