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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I apologize if this is the wrong section. I have a 1972 CB350 that I picked up non-running with just over 12,000 miles. “Was running when last rode” yada yada bike sat for six years. I have the bike in a shop and I’m pretty sure I’m getting ripped off but more specifically I need to know if a bike is able to shift if it is missing clutch bearings. I’m fairly certain the mechanic took my clutch apart and lost them but I cannot any case he’s claimig that they were never there. I don’t know how to identify the parts any differently all the guy told me was that there were no “clutch bearings” when he took it apart. When I picked up the bike I was able to shift through the gears and I even tried push starting it (never got more than a sputter out of the exhaust). Again. My question is with no “clutch bearings” would it have been possible to switch gears? Thank you for any help
 

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I'm struggling with what part you call Clutch Bearings?

The clutch on a CB350 is Cable operated.

The cable connects to a lever assembly behind the Left Rear Cover (where the front sprocket for the drive chain is located).

The Lever has a part behind it that has (3) Embedded Ball Bearings that sit in RAMPED Slots on a matching part.
When the Clutch Lever is pulled in this lever is rotated and the Ramps cause the part to PUSH against the Clutch Rod.
Inside the Lever part is a hole where a 5/16 Ball Bearing sits. This Ball bearing is the contact point for the Rod that moves the Clutch Pack on the opposite side of the motor.
Auto part Diagram Drawing Design Cylinder
The area I am referencing is in the red circle.
The Ramped Part is #15 this is captive with #14 in the Cover and is the adjuster mechanism.
The (3) Ball Lifter is #12
The Lever is #11
The 5/16 (#10) - Ball Bearing is #10
The Push Rod is #9

I hope this helps.
One more thing- Right CLICK on the Pic and OPEN in a NEW WINDOW to view larger.
 

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all the more reason to avoid taking your vintage bike to a shop... virtually none today know how to work on them and like most car dealers, they're pretty much all thieves even when they do
 

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The clutch adjustment is sooooo picky. I was convinced mine was broken somehow and a few mm turn to the adjuster and it has worked perfectly ever since.
 
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