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Discussion Starter #1
I purchased this 1967 CB77 in Dayton, OH back it December of 2014. The previous owner had owned it since 1977. It wasn’t running but the engine was free and it was mostly complete. The bike had been painted multiple times, at least once with a brush. The right crankcase cover had been broken at the kickstarter at some point which seems to be a common failure point. Here are some pictures I was able to dig up from the day I got it home. More to follow.











 

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That's actually a '68 spec CB77. They had the larger '68 tail light and chrome fenders instead of the silver painted ones. Honda sold them alongside the new '68 CB350 to clear out their stock. Fairly rare bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's actually a '68 spec CB77. They had the larger '68 tail light and chrome fenders instead of the silver painted ones. Honda sold them alongside the new '68 CB350 to clear out their stock. Fairly rare bike.
Interesting, I was under the impression that '67 was the last actual production year and had the chrome fenders. The title I got from the 2nd owner that purchased it in '77 had the bike listed as a '67 but that's as far back as my records for this particular bike go. The guy paid just $50 for it back in '77 and according to him it was a complete running bike. Quite a deal.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
As mentioned in my opening post this project started back in 2014 so I'm doing my best to dig up the pictures I'd taken along the way. Not much was done during 2015 besides the disassembly and cataloging of parts. Here are some from the media blasting stage from December of 2015.































 

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Discussion Starter #8
Fast forwarding about a year from the pics in my previous post, here's a before and after of the parts I had zinc plated. I've been using Parker Metal Finishing in NC for many years and have always been happy with their customer service and the quality of their work.

I always run anything that I'm going to have zinc plated through my parts tumbler and then follow-up with a wire wheel on the bench grinder. Plating is like painting, the more you put into the prep the better your results will be.

The brake rod in the "after" pic is for one of my CB350's. I always seem to forget something and end up tossing it in with the next bike's parts.




 

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What a great find you have there, and nice progress on the parts. Looking forward to seeing more pics of your progress as you're able to post them.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Here's another photo dump. I'm trying to collect and post photos each day if time allows so I can get caught up and then start posting in "real time". These were taken in early February 2016. All of the aluminum peices were sealed with Sharkhide Metal Protectant sprayed with a Preval Spray Gun. I've used this method for many years with great success. The hardware is a mixture of re-plated original parts and OEM replacements (primarily the JIS screws). Enjoy.











































 

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More nice work... next project, you are required to post all pictures in a project log in real time! :D Thanks for retro-sharing though
 

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More nice work... next project, you are required to post all pictures in a project log in real time! :D Thanks for retro-sharing though
Ha! My next "project" will be convincing my wife that I need a next project. ;)
 

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I thought I'd share a bit about my organization method for parts that get sent out for plating. For those who haven't had it done before, know this, no matter how sorted and organized your parts are when you send them out, they will come back to you in one or more mixed bags. With the exception of larger items (sprockets, etc.) the parts are barrel plated. Which means they basically get dumped into a large rotating drum/barrel to be plated.

To keep things organized, especially when a project spans a long period of time like this one has, I keep a notebook with pages that correspond with the parts fiche diagrams and list and photograph each group of parts that I'm sending. This way I know exactly what got sent out, and which area of the bike it belongs on. Here are some of the photos from this project.

I'd love to hear some of your organization methods as I'm always looking for ways to improve on mine.































 

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You're certainly far more organized than I am about this stuff... I can appreciate your system, and I'd probably do more of it myself if I sent out so many parts to be plated. I didn't need to have much stuff done and as a result, I just cleaned things up and in some cases, cleared them afterward if they might have the tendency to rust again. Your organization and attention to detail shows - I just arrange stuff in small groups all around my garage on the tops of toolboxes, tables, available bench space, wherever I can put things so they won't be disturbed, according to location on the bike. My 450 was apart for a year after it was built, and I knew right were everything was... only because I had no other projects to work on in between :D
 

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I put all small items in plastic food bags. All large parts a wrapped to protect them . Everything is labeled and stored in boxes. I have had bikes down for up to three years while working on other projects and have never had a problem when it came time put them back together. We all have our own ways.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I put all small items in plastic food bags. All large parts a wrapped to protect them . Everything is labeled and stored in boxes. I have had bikes down for up to three years while working on other projects and have never had a problem when it came time put them back together. We all have our own ways.

Bill
+1 on the food bags. They are especially helpful when organizing a big shipment of parts. All those individually wrapped bolts, screws, nuts, and washers can be a real pain to dig through. For large projects I typically print labels and keep a bag for each page of the parts fiche. When new parts come in I sort them at that time so when it comes time for reassembly I can just grab the bag and in theory everything should be there. During disassembly I skip the printed labels and use little "toe tags" (cardboard tags with string or wire attached). That way they can be attached to larger items or just tossed in the appropriate bag.










 

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Man, I just hope MW won't see this post, otherwise will spend the weekend in the shed cleaning :D
 
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