Build Up Worn Brake Drum CL450K6
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Thread: Build Up Worn Brake Drum CL450K6

  1. #1
    Supporting Member David Babbitt's Avatar
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    Build Up Worn Brake Drum CL450K6

    With 97k miles on my 1974 CL450K6, the front brake drum is wearing thin. I call the drum the portion of the wheel to which the spokes are attached. I'll see tomorrow if it is showing any aluminum though the steel. New brake shoes don't fill in the gap and both brake arms track over 45 degrees until the shoes make contact. Things are just worn out.

    Has anyone built up wheel linings with 1/16" or thinner steel? I'm thinking of purchasing 2.5' of steel, maybe 1" wide, bend into a 10" diameter hoop, drill holes through it, then mount inside the wheel and weld to the wheel at the holes and at the ends. Use an angle grinder to smooth the welded holes out. The steel/aluminum that exists would be a heat sink for the new steel lining weld spots. Thoughts?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Alan F.'s Avatar
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    Well for 523 Euros plus shipping you can have a new one:
    https://www.cmsnl.com/honda-cl450k6-.../#.XSLD1lMpCdM

    For $63 and nearly $100 shipping (depending on your location I suppose)
    There is this low mileage example:
    https://www.ebay.com/i/253625685055?...CABEgLW1_D_BwE

    And if you have a look here and scroll down there is a list of other bikes the same hub was used on which includes CB450 K1 and K2, CL72 and CL77
    https://www.partzilla.com/product/ho...f0758e225d33af

    I've never heard of relining a brake hub as you've described, but I'm sure the correct part can be made. I'd assume the relining process would be similar to replacing a cylinder sleeve. I remember reading how Alan Millyard created a 4LS front hub from scratch for a replica Honda racer, he added his own iron brake linings to a fabricated hub so it certainly can be done.
    CB250 Nighthawk projects 92,93,92.
    CM400C Sold 7-21-18 It's been fun, buh-bye.
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    Senior Member TOOLS1's Avatar
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    Your way will not work!!!! First I would measure the ID of the drum and check against specs. If it is confirmed to be out of spec, I would then check with a company that relines brake shoes and see if they could do a thicker lining. If no luck there you will need to first find a lathe big enough to turn the drum. Then turn the ID smooth and round. After that, you will need to machine the OD of a steel ring to at least a 0.004" press fit. Then press the new ring into the drum and turn the ID back to the factory ID. This way it will be round and true with the axle.
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  5. #4
    Senior Member mike in idaho's Avatar
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    +1, Michael morse,over at https://www.vintagebrake.com/ can hook you up with some oversize linings. BTW, did you measure the drum diameter,against the factory service manual specs? If the drum was out of spec I would just source a good used hub somewhere, gotta be a bunch cheaper than putting a custom liner inside the drum.
    '65 YG1
    '65 CB160
    '66 CL160
    '67 CL77
    '68 TR6
    '69 T100R
    '69 T120R
    '72 Commando 750
    '78 XS650E
    '79 Gl1000
    '81 440 LTD
    My company car is a Kenworth

  6. #5
    Sensei 66Sprint's Avatar
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    Late CB/CL72 and 77 are NOT the same as the 450's....They are 36 hole hubs and the 450 has holes for 40 spokes......
    "I have a mind like a steel trap.....Old and rusty, of antiquated design, and hard to get stuff back out of...."
    Contact info: E-mail; [email protected] Phone; 540-525-5199

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    Senior Member Alan F.'s Avatar
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    Curious that they're not the same (36 vs 40 spokes) good catch there. I took a look and none of the rim numbers coincide either.

    I guess you can't trust those cross references on parts sites (like Partzilla) as much as I thought.
    CB250 Nighthawk projects 92,93,92.
    CM400C Sold 7-21-18 It's been fun, buh-bye.
    Fork Swap info: http://sites.google.com/site/alansdocuments/

  8. #7
    Senior Member mike in idaho's Avatar
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    Actually, the CL77s do have 40 spoke front wheels. Early small brake versions have 40 spokes both front and rear, the later ones have 40 in the front and 36 in the rear. The 40 hole front hub has a different part number than the one for the 450.
    '65 YG1
    '65 CB160
    '66 CL160
    '67 CL77
    '68 TR6
    '69 T100R
    '69 T120R
    '72 Commando 750
    '78 XS650E
    '79 Gl1000
    '81 440 LTD
    My company car is a Kenworth

  9. #8
    Sensei 66Sprint's Avatar
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    Mike is again correct, and apparently, the CL 77 I got my wheel from was actually running a CB77 hub (36 spokes), but it was laced to a 19" rim (Not the 18" I vaguely remember as being on the CB).......

    A "Bitsa" part and I didn't even register it as such......
    Last edited by 66Sprint; 07-08-2019 at 08:26 PM.
    "I have a mind like a steel trap.....Old and rusty, of antiquated design, and hard to get stuff back out of...."
    Contact info: E-mail; [email protected] Phone; 540-525-5199

  10. #9
    Supporting Member David Babbitt's Avatar
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    I rushed to conclusion as I opened up the 40 spoke hub and steel isn't worn too far but the brake shoes are. Nominally 3/32" thick and worn to 1/32" at the thinnest part. Common Motor Collective sells new shoes.

    I did take the overall diameter across the shoes with them relaxed, 7-5/8". When rotated beyond 45 degrees to where the rotational parts almost interfere with the stationary, diameter is now 7-7/8". New shoes is all I need. But I would still ponder and consider welding up the wheel if its ever came to that. Wouldn't be mixing steel with aluminum, just steel with steel. Not having a continuously smooth surface but with welded holes attaching both isn't uncommon as I've seen discs on motorcycles with drilled holes through them for the pads to rub against.

  11. #10
    Senior Member TOOLS1's Avatar
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    There is a LOT of difference between a disc brake and a drum brake!!!! You have been told that the method you are wanting to do will not work and how to do it correctly. Proceded at your own risk.
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