Engine Casings Bead Blasted - CB500T
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Thread: Engine Casings Bead Blasted - CB500T

  1. #1
    Senior Member KnucleBusting360's Avatar
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    Engine Casings Bead Blasted - CB500T

    Gurus,

    Well, I just got my engine casings back from my coatings guy in Chicago and they look awesome! He glass bead blasted them and they sure look pretty ... my question is, they are pretty clean but I am wondering if I need to do anything to further clean them in prep for re-assembly ... I know there are oil passages in these covers & casings that can't be clogged so I plan on getting some pipe cleaners (like your grandpa used to use on his pipe) and attempt to push them through those oil passages (or maybe guitar wire if the pipe cleaners don't fit) ... I will also use my compressor to air blast the passageways as well ...

    Is there something I should use to wipe down the insides of the casings? Maybe a light oil or something? Here's a few pics ... I'm taking the cylinder heads and pistons to M&M Motorsports here in Chicago to be evaluated for tolerances to see if I can get away with honing the cylinders or if they'll have to be bored ...

    Any advise is welcome! Thanks Bill

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    Senior Member WintrSol's Avatar
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    You don't want to use the old-school pipe cleaners from a tobacco store, as they are made from cotton and shed fibers. Better to find the 'fancy' ones from an art supplies store; for one, they are lots longer, and you may need that, and they shed less (usually). A good blow-out with compressed air may be all that is needed, assuming your coatings guy didn't already do that; save the pipe cleaners for any that may be stuffed.
    KnucleBusting360 and Rob Axel like this.
    Rick

    Mine is a mostly 1970 CB450K3

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    Supporting Member clofan's Avatar
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    Compressed air should do the job for the most part, although pipe cleaners won't hurt. I spent way too long waiting on my 3gal to fill back up so I could spray some more; eventually took it to a shop with a real compressor and borrowed their blower! 10 minutes later, done.

    I don't think you need to treat the interior metal with anything, bare aluminum will be fine and will be coated with motor oil soon enough.
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    Senior Member tbpmusic's Avatar
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    Pressure wash then vigorous blow out with a compressor.
    They won't stay pretty for long anyway..........
    Bill Lane
    Honda Twins Founding Member

    No advice, just info

    '75 CB200T, '71 CB450 K4 Half-Breed, '72 CL350 (Sold), '81 CM200T, '72 C70M
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    Senior Member DethHalo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KnucleBusting360 View Post
    Gurus,
    I'm taking the cylinder heads and pistons to M&M Motorsports here in Chicago to be evaluated for tolerances to see if I can get away with honing the cylinders or if they'll have to be bored ...

    Any advise is welcome! Thanks Bill
    Try to avoid boring the cylinders. Oversize 500T pistons are made of unobtanium and rarer than hens teeth...
    CB500T Project - https://www.hondatwins.net/forums/1-...tml#post154735
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    Senior Member the-chauffeur's Avatar
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    After a very expensive episode with a CB750 engine that resulted in the cam being starved of oil and several other post-build head gasket leaks, my process after vapour blasting is something like this:

    - check the head and barrel faces are completely flat. Invariably, I've found that they aren't, so I flat them off using sandpaper on a piece of glass (look on YouTube for guides - it's pretty straightforward). Any mess created at this stage is then removed when I . . .

    - flush all the engine parts out with paraffin (cheap, quick drying and considerably safer than petrol/gas) in a washing up bowl - regardless of whether or not the guy who did the work tells me he's already cleaned them out. I also use a small paintbrush and focus on anywhere oil gets pumped through. When that's done I . . .

    - use compressed air to speed drying and remove any of the other beads, bits 'n' grit that might have stayed put.

    That entire process generally takes less than an hour, but it means it saves me a whole load of time and effort further down the line. During the rebuild, I use assembly lube on bits that move, and oil on the pistons/rings, but there's no need to put any other coatings on the insides - the minute you run the engine (assuming it's gone back together correctly), everything inside will get sprayed with oil.
    Last edited by the-chauffeur; 06-06-2019 at 04:27 PM. Reason: clarification
    CL77 (1966)
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  8. #7
    Senior Member WintrSol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by the-chauffeur View Post
    - flush all the engine parts out with paraffin (cheap, quick drying and considerably safer than petrol/gas) in a washing up bowl
    For those of us in the US, who may not know, paraffin is called kerosene here, not the wax we make candles with.
    Rick

    Mine is a mostly 1970 CB450K3

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    Senior Member Lefty's Avatar
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    Yep, you gotta clean them. Any oil that was left on the engine before being blasted is now a grinding paste.

  10. #9
    Senior Member Bill H's Avatar
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    I wash the parts with dawn and hot water,then high pressure spray followed with high pressure air.

    Bill

  11. #10
    Senior Member pattyandrick's Avatar
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    I believe the exterior is painted with high temp aluminun paint.

    Sent from my SM-J320V using Tapatalk

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