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  1. #1
    Junior Member FrankS's Avatar
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    replacement screws

    I have a need for several replacement screws on my new to me 1971 CL350 as I go over the bike's systems: lock screw for speedo cable, points cover, oil flinger cover, and stator cover. Those Japanese almost-Philips heads get mangled trying to remove them on a bike that has sat in a previous owner's shed for many years. Surprisingly, I have not been able to find the screws I need from the usual hardware stores around here. They are a standard metric size but with a sloped shoulder under the screw head. Around here they are called oval head machine screws. Any recommendations for sources? Thanks!
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  2. #2
    Senior Member 540nova's Avatar
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    Unless you're doing a restoration, consider replacing with socket (Allen) head fasteners. Full engine kits are available online.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member TOOLS1's Avatar
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    They are JIS (Japanese industrial standard) screws. And if you use a proper JIS screwdriver they will come right out without being buggered. I like the Vessel brand screwdrivers. They are the best screwdrivers I have ever used. You can get them on Amazon. Another good tool to have is an impact screwdriver. The kind you hit with a hammer. Most of these do come with JIS bits. The JIS screws are a lot better quality than the soft gummy stainless steel Allen bolts. You just have to use the JIS screwdriver. As for finding the correct screws, just go to your local Honda Dealer. Or check out Partzilla.com
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  5. #4
    Senior Member Gixxer-18's Avatar
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    Also known as Countersunk screws...you can get a bag of 6mm off eBay for a few bucks... just specify length....
    HTH.
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  6. #5
    Senior Member DieselKrampus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gixxer-18 View Post
    Also known as Countersunk screws...you can get a bag of 6mm off eBay for a few bucks... just specify length....
    HTH.
    Or don't pay any shipping because you can get them also at most local hardware stores like Ace, Tru Value, Sears(if they still exist in your area ) etc...

    I found them easily at my local Tru Value. Fwiw

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  7. #6
    Senior Member DieselKrampus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOOLS1 View Post
    The JIS screws are a lot better quality than the soft gummy stainless steel Allen bolts. You just have to use the JIS screwdriver.
    Huh, you must have either a very well preserved specimen, or just excellent luck. Because every single 45+yr old JIS fastener I have ever come across seems to be made from some kind of lead/steel alloy. Even with the proper driver, the heads on them seem soft as nickel/tin solder wire. I've never been lead to believe that they were of a stronger grade than readily available stainless fasteners. But that could just be my luck and my "barn find" seasoning on my particular bike. Just my experience.

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  8. #7
    Junior Member FrankS's Avatar
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    Those screws are definitely of softer metal than modern stainless steel. I have an impact tool but messed up several screw heads. On the oil flinger cover, I had to drill the heads off.

    I've tried Can.Tire and TSC stores with no luck. I'll try those mentioned if they are in Canada where I am.

    This is definitely not a museum restoration project.
    Last edited by FrankS; 06-27-2019 at 09:38 PM.

  9. #8
    Senior Member DieselKrampus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrankS View Post
    Those screws are definitely of softer metal than modern stainless steel. I have an impact tool but messed up several screw heads. On the oil flinger cover, I had to drill the heads off.

    I've tried Can.Tire and TSC stores with no luck. I'll try those mentioned if they are in Canada where I am.
    Sorry, I did not realize you were in Canada. Hopefully you can find them locally, otherwise ebay might be your best bet, as mentioned above.

    On the oil slinger cover, how did you manage to extract the rest of the screws after drilling the heads off? That's exactly where I am right now. I managed to successfully remove one of the three with the impact screwdriver, but the other two heads just turned to metallic mush as soon as the impact applied torque to them. I have since replaced the one I did remove with a modern, contersunk stainless allen-head screw, but the other two are mangled and still in there. Any suggestions or tips are appreciated.

    Good luck with your hardware search, I hope you don't have too much trouble finding what you need!

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  10. #9
    Junior Member FrankS's Avatar
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    Remove the screws that you can with screw driver and/or impact tool. For the ones where the head is mangled, use a drill and a drill bit just slightly larger than the diameter of the threaded part of the screw. Drill slowly so as to get just get the screw, not the cover. At this point the screw head disconnects from the threaded part leaving a stud. The cover now comes off. Use vice grips to unscrew the remaining stud from the engine case. (The part of the screw that remains should stick out a bit from the engine case which vice grips can get a hold of. If not, you'll need a small screw extractor bit and run the drill in reverse.)
    Last edited by FrankS; 06-28-2019 at 07:39 AM.
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  11. #10
    Senior Member mike in idaho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOOLS1 View Post
    They are JIS (Japanese industrial standard) screws. And if you use a proper JIS screwdriver they will come right out without being buggered. I like the Vessel brand screwdrivers. They are the best screwdrivers I have ever used. You can get them on Amazon. Another good tool to have is an impact screwdriver. The kind you hit with a hammer. Most of these do come with JIS bits. The JIS screws are a lot better quality than the soft gummy stainless steel Allen bolts. You just have to use the JIS screwdriver. As for finding the correct screws, just go to your local Honda Dealer. Or check out Partzilla.com
    TOOLS
    +1, if you don't like dealing with a buggered phillips style screw, you sure won't like to deal with a trashed allen head screw. The type of ham-fisted character who destroys phillips head screws is also very good at rounding-out allen heads. Drilling stainless,even the cheap stuff those screw kits are made of, is a real pain.
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