73 CB 350 trans downshifts
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Thread: 73 CB 350 trans downshifts

  1. #1
    MJG
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    73 CB 350 trans downshifts

    Bike runs great and shifts up and down smooth as butter when moving

    When I am slowing to a stop sign if I roll up and stop and am in 3 or 4th gear it doesn't like to shift down to first if I am stopped

    SO I usually downshift as I am approaching a stop and end in 2nd gear--then it easily shifts to first for me to take off again

    Anyone have this issue

    Its not all the time but it doesn't seem to like multiple downshifts ( gear changes) while sitting still

    its an old bike and I run it easy so I dont force anything

    Fresh oil- Honda 10-40, new cables etc and it all runs perfect

    I am thinking Ill replace the clutch since its 45 years old. Bike only has 8k on it

    Any other ideas ?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 73 CB 350 trans downshifts-51b-zbezqne0fkxvin9uta.jpg  

  2. #2
    Senior Member mike in idaho's Avatar
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    That's how it's designed, to shift when the gears are turning.
    540nova, J-T and krukster86 like this.
    '65 YG1
    '65 CB160
    '66 CL160
    '67 CL77
    '68 TR6
    '69 T100R
    '69 T120R
    '72 Commando 750
    '78 XS650E
    '79 Gl1000
    '81 440 LTD
    My company car is a Kenworth

  3. #3
    Senior Member chaindrivecharlie's Avatar
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    Yep!, only works if tranny is spinning, so your good to go.

    Sent from my SM-N920R4 using Tapatalk
    Charlie

    1972 CL 175 K6
    1972 CL 350 K4
    1981 CM 400 C

    Joshua 24:15

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  5. #4
    Super Moderator ancientdad's Avatar
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    ^^^above is absolutely correct. In other words - as the dealerships have adopted the phrasing over the decades - "operates as designed". These transmissions won't shift from one gear to another without the gears moving internally to line up the "dogs" on the sides of the gears, so if you're sitting still in 4th from a panic stop, for example, you have to ease the clutch out as you try to downshift. And, if the clutch doesn't slip under heavy load or hard acceleration... save your money, you're only dealing with 33 to 36 crankshaft horsepower
    Tom

    CL450 project reboot, street legal this time
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    CB350K1 full patina project
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    running points... because I'm too old for mysteries that begin with pushing

  6. #5
    Senior Member Erwin's Avatar
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    I have noticed that, when it comes to downshifting, there are three types of riders.

    1 People who downshift early before a traffic light without giving it throttle, letting the clutch do all the work.
    2 People that downshift at the latest moment when the bike is almost at a standstill
    3 People that give it some throttle during downshifts (mostly in combination with type 1)

    I am definitely a 3 and 2 kinda guy

    Each method has its shortcomings
    1972 CB350K3 General Export | 1976 CB200T K0

  7. #6
    Super Moderator ancientdad's Avatar
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    Hard to understand that there are any shortcomings to method 3 - the whole idea of clean downshifting is matching the engine speed to the increase in rpm the transmission encounters when going to a lower gear, to help reduce the clunks of gears increasing in speed while the dogs are engaging. Easier on the dogs on the gears and far less noisy/clunky when blending the engine rpm more closely, not to mention if the traffic situation quickly changes you'll be ready to accelerate more quickly as you'll be in the proper gear for the speed as your speed decreases and less potential dog wear on the gears as well. There will always be the panic stop situation you'll encounter on occasion when there is not time for downshifts, just massive use of both brakes to stop in time - it happens to all of us once in a while, but then we just use the clutch and gently work our way down to first gear, even on the side of the road if necessary to reduce the possibility of horns behind you from those who don't understand a constant-mesh motorcycle transmission
    Tom

    CL450 project reboot, street legal this time
    Budget drag bike project
    CB350K1 full patina project
    Ride along at the drag strip


    running points... because I'm too old for mysteries that begin with pushing

  8. #7
    Member jjdugen's Avatar
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    I did half suspect my K had slightly worn gearbox dogs too, but, as you all say, sweet as butter as long as the downshifts are done when rolling. Bit of a faff when stopped so the word is, look ahead and plan. BTW, I wish Suzuki would sell the other manufacturers their gearbox design, the sweatest boxes on the market.

  9. #8
    Super Moderator ancientdad's Avatar
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    Never ridden a Suzuki of any size, but another bike that had a simple but effective and mostly issue-free gearbox was Hodaka. Ball-bearing locking design that engaged each gear chosen to the shaft while the others free-wheeled, with the only real wearout item being the ratchet arrangement in the left cover that moved the spindle that engaged the balls in each gear appropriately. Slick, simple and reliable for those small engines

    https://hodaka-parts.com/92B_C.asp
    chaindrivecharlie likes this.
    Tom

    CL450 project reboot, street legal this time
    Budget drag bike project
    CB350K1 full patina project
    Ride along at the drag strip


    running points... because I'm too old for mysteries that begin with pushing

  10. #9
    Senior Member sikeclass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erwin View Post
    I have noticed that, when it comes to downshifting, there are three types of riders.

    1 People who downshift early before a traffic light without giving it throttle, letting the clutch do all the work.
    2 People that downshift at the latest moment when the bike is almost at a standstill
    3 People that give it some throttle during downshifts (mostly in combination with type 1)

    I am definitely a 3 and 2 kinda guy

    Each method has its shortcomings
    For a guy who doesn't know better, can you give some details about "shortcomings"? I was always the guy who pulled in the clutch and coasted to the stoplight, clicking down the gears to be speed appropriate, but never letting the clutch out and never giving any gas. Lately I've been blipping the gas before clicking down, but still not letting go of the clutch. I don't know if that makes a difference, but I've just picked it up as a habit. (I think because it's been prone to crapping out on me, and that little blip lets me know it's still there.)

    Is there a right way and a wrong way? I remember with cars, there were guys who always liked to be engaged in a gear and would row down through all the gears coming to every stop. Again, I was a "push in the clutch, then put it in first at the stop" person. When I'd ask, they'd mumble something about engine braking saving brakes and always being ready to take off again. Is it the same kind of idea?
    Last edited by sikeclass; 06-03-2019 at 06:55 PM.
    - 1972 Honda CB350
    - 7 years and 4 crates of spark plugs later, it runs, but there's definitely room for improvement

    I've made a lot of mistakes, some which I haven't realized yet. Any questions, opinions or info has to come with that huge grain of salt.

  11. #10
    Senior Member mike in idaho's Avatar
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    It's always nice to be in first gear at a traffic light, just in case that idiot behind you is too busy texting to stop.
    ancientdad likes this.
    '65 YG1
    '65 CB160
    '66 CL160
    '67 CL77
    '68 TR6
    '69 T100R
    '69 T120R
    '72 Commando 750
    '78 XS650E
    '79 Gl1000
    '81 440 LTD
    My company car is a Kenworth

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