CB200T Hydraulic Disc Brake Conversion - How To
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Thread: CB200T Hydraulic Disc Brake Conversion - How To

  1. #1
    Supporting Member CB200T75's Avatar
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    CB200T Hydraulic Disc Brake Conversion - How To

    I am going to be converting my 1975 CB200T to a hydraulic disc brake. I will be covering my progress in this thread in the hopes to help anyone else who is also considering doing this modification. I want to thank 66Sprint for all his help in this matter with his recommendations as to what parts to use and how to configure the controls etc. I am also stealing the photograph from Untold in his thread Here . This might take a while, but I'll put in lots of pictures (or as many as I feel necessary) and the best description I can manage. Feel free to contact me with any questions. Thanks.

    Step 1: Parts list.

    Per 66Sprint's recommendation, I bought this: Caliper/Reservoir. I haven't received it yet, but I'm assured it works great. It was also suggested that a CB500 right hand control would work. Untold had a new brake line made. I intend to do the same, probably in stainless for aesthetics. You will also need to fabricate a bracket. It's recommended you make one out of cardboard first, then out of metal. You can see how Untold made his if you follow the link provided earlier. He made his out of three pieces of sheet steel. One bolted to the fork, another sandwiched and a third bolted to the caliper. You can also make it out of a single piece if you so choose.
    Currently working on a 1975 Honda CB200T.
    My build thread
    Trip Journals: http://The View from a Triumph Bonne...'s Journal

  2. #2
    Super Moderator J-T's Avatar
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    Re: CB200T Hydraulic Disc Brake Conversion - How To

    Thanks for sharing, I'll be looking forward to following your progress.
    JT
    81 CM400T Under re-construction
    82 GL500

  3. #3
    Supporting Member CB200T75's Avatar
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    Re: CB200T Hydraulic Disc Brake Conversion - How To

    I haven't abandoned the project, it's just low on the list of priorities at the moment. Trying to get the bike started, then I'll start working on the brake caliper again.
    Currently working on a 1975 Honda CB200T.
    My build thread
    Trip Journals: http://The View from a Triumph Bonne...'s Journal

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  5. #4
    Supporting Member Epicracer's Avatar
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    Re: CB200T Hydraulic Disc Brake Conversion - How To

    i've subscribed, and would really like to see what you have come up with. great job and am anxiously waiting.

  6. #5
    AllGoose's Avatar
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    Re: CB200T Hydraulic Disc Brake Conversion - How To

    CB200T75, did you ever receive the caliper/reservoir assembly from Lifan Engine Parts? I ordered mine back in September but it's still back-ordered

  7. #6
    Supporting Member CB200T75's Avatar
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    Re: CB200T Hydraulic Disc Brake Conversion - How To

    Yes, it took a week or two, but I do have it. Sorry for the delayed response.

    Sent from my LG-LS840 using Tapatalk
    Currently working on a 1975 Honda CB200T.
    My build thread
    Trip Journals: http://The View from a Triumph Bonne...'s Journal

  8. #7
    Supporting Member CB200T75's Avatar
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    Re: CB200T Hydraulic Disc Brake Conversion - How To

    I have the caliper, just need to vet some metal and some time.

    Sent from my LG-LS840 using Tapatalk
    Currently working on a 1975 Honda CB200T.
    My build thread
    Trip Journals: http://The View from a Triumph Bonne...'s Journal

  9. #8
    Supporting Member CB200T75's Avatar
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    For any CB/CL 200 owners out there who want a hydro front brake. I would be willing to trace my current design onto a piece of paper for your to make your own if you want. It will already be the correct size, with correct hole placements and indicators of where to drill and tap (and what pitch). You will need to provide a piece of 1/4" steel and the ability cut it out. I will be updating the design later on (in the winter probably, maybe this summer) to accommodate a two piece steel bracket rather than the current one. It will be a little bit more elegant that the current (functioning) bracket. I won't be making it for you, but you'll at least have a solid starting point.
    Currently working on a 1975 Honda CB200T.
    My build thread
    Trip Journals: http://The View from a Triumph Bonne...'s Journal

  10. #9
    Supporting Member CB200T75's Avatar
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    Okay, so this past week was my spring break from school. Although I still wound up interspersing my garage (wife calls it "stinky-man" time) time with homework, I wound up working on the bike non-stop from 8 am to 1 am most days. But, I got A LOT done. In fact, the bike is 99% done. I got the electrics working (thank you so, so, so much to Steve and Matt (Sparck)!!!), I made conversion for the front brake to hydraulic, I made the new intake runners and boots, I made the control console, got the voltmeter wired, starter button wired, clutch cable put on, replaced the rear brake shoes, balanced the front wheel, got the clutch working, changed out the light bulbs in the tach, and there's much more I forgot to mention. I wanted to post how I built the bracket for the front brake. It was a bear to do, but it works, it looks half way decent and it provides the improved functionality of a hydraulic brake over the stock cable-actuated mechanism. I haven't ever used the stock one, but I was led to believe that it was pretty anemic.

    So, let's start with tools and supplies:
    1/4" steel plate
    drill press + drills
    cutting lubricant
    jig-saw + blades
    transfer punches (make life a lot easier)
    tap set
    dremel + sanding disc
    bench grinder
    bolts, split wasters, 8mm flat washers

    The first photos are for procedure only. It was a failed attempt at the bracket, but the 3-piece bracket at the end is the one I made yesterday that works. I was just in a hurry and didn't document it because I had already documented one attempt and didn't feel like doing it twice. I will post an attachment with the paper patterns (complete with hole locations, drill sizes and where to tap) shortly. I just need some graph paper for a scale reference.

    1) Trace the pattern onto your metal stock. In my case, I was given a 1'x1'x0.25" steel, so that's what I used. Use the transfer punch to mark the location of the bracket holes for the fork. They are marked on the drawings I provided. Again, these images are for demonstration purposes only. The shown bracket is NOT the one I used, it doesn't fit. The one I used is at the end!!



    2) Use a punch and mark around the circumference of the outline. Make sure the edge of the punch just touches the outline of the part. This edge should coincide with the final drill size you will use to drill the guide-holes for the jig-saw. Again, these images are for demonstration purposes only. The shown bracket is NOT the one I used, it doesn't fit. The one I used is at the end!!



    3) Go to the drill press (or hand drill) and drill your pilot holes. If using steel, use cutting lubricant to prevent overheating and dulling of the drill. After all of the pilot holes are drilled, drill the final size holes you'll be using to "connect the dots" with the jig-saw. Again, these images are for demonstration purposes only. The shown bracket is NOT the one I used, it doesn't fit. The one I used is at the end!!



    4) Now that your "dots" are finished, move your work piece over to the jig-saw to cut out the piece. It's a good idea to drill your bracket holes before you cut the bracket out so that you have a larger surface area to hold onto. It sucks when the drill press picks the work piece up and spins it around. I used a metal blade with my jig-saw, and I used a relatively low speed (it's a variable speed saw). Cutting shouldn't be done too fast or else heat builds up and dulls the blade. Also, if a tooth should be broken off, it is necessary to cut around the broken tooth. It's harder than the steel and the saw won't be able to cut through it. Proceed to "connect the dots" and cut the work piece out. Again, these images are for demonstration purposes only. The shown bracket is NOT the one I used, it doesn't fit. The one I used is at the end!!





    5) Bench grinder time. I used the coarse stone on mine. Knock the "teeth" that are left over from cutting the work piece out down and grind to the remaining outline left over on the work piece. Watch out, the metal gets hot. I wore welding gloves during this. As you can see, the grinder leaves a pretty raggedy edge. I took this off with the dremel and a sanding wheel. Again, these images are for demonstration purposes only. The shown bracket is NOT the one I used, it doesn't fit. The one I used is at the end!!





    6) After you've cleaned the work piece up with the sanding disc, it's ready to be tapped and bolted on. I strongly recommend purchasing a quality tap-set. The one from the auto parts store didn't hack it for me. In fact, it snapped off inside the work piece. It wasn't user error either, I used lubricant, turned in a bit, turned out a full turn, turned in a bit until I met resistance and turned it back out. I ended up buying a Craftsman set and it's great. Make sure to have the work piece locked in a vice or clamped to a table or something. Pay attention to have the tap perpendicular to the work piece to ensure the bolt goes in at the correct attitude.



    7) Test fit, these pictures are of the bracket that I made yesterday and am using. These are the correct ones. Yes, I'm aware that the part that bolts onto the caliper looks like a penis. No it was not intentional. I wound up having to use 1 flat washer between the plates to offset the caliper enough to clear the rotor. I also had to grind the bolts down flush to the bracket. It fits great, has excellent clearance everywhere and doesn't drag. Also, as far as I can tell, I way overbuilt this thing. It should be nice and stiff with out lateral or longitudinal flex. I'll post the pdf with the outlines you can print off and make your own with. They will have the drill markings on them, and the center punch holes for all of the bolt mounting points. They are also labeled which holes need to be tapped. Hope this was helpful.











    Currently working on a 1975 Honda CB200T.
    My build thread
    Trip Journals: http://The View from a Triumph Bonne...'s Journal

  11. #10
    Supporting Member Epicracer's Avatar
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    if willing i would really like a copy of the template.

    great work!

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