Flat-tracker type 450 custom - what do we think ? - Page 2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 19 of 19
Like Tree8Likes

Thread: Flat-tracker type 450 custom - what do we think ?

  1. #11
    Senior Member -alan-'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    598
    Quote Originally Posted by ancientdad View Post
    To really be a true flat track-styled replica, it should have a 2-1 exhaust exiting the right side for the continuous left turns...
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    I like it. If it were mine I'd change the exhausts and give it some 19" shouldered alloy rims with iddy biddy disc brakes
    The one thing I didn't really like about it was the exhaust - both the colour and routing.

    Came across this in an old bike mag I had - I know its a Triumph, but the exhaust design is much better looking methinks:



    (Even has your kind of brakes Lefty )
    Last edited by -alan-; 12-02-2019 at 01:12 PM.
    CB450 K5

  2. #12
    Super Moderator ancientdad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Nature Coast FL
    Posts
    9,198
    ^^^and how could a 450 engine make a bike any harder to flat track than a big old Triumph lump...? okay, maybe a little because of the massive head up high...
    Tom

    CL450 project reboot, street legal this time
    Budget drag bike project
    CB350K1 full patina project
    Ride along at the drag strip


    running points... because I'm too old for mysteries that begin with pushing

  3. #13
    Senior Member oupa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Posts
    687
    Beautiful bike! I love it and while it's "tracker" styled, it'd hardly be mistaken for a flat track bike.

    I don't mean to take anything away from this great bike but other than some number decals, no front fender and a FT style tail... That said, the tail is GREAT! I'd be interested in that seat myself. Any info???

    As "street trackers" go, this is a VERY nice example. It's too often overlooked that the more important word in the name is "street." Street tracker being almost an oxymoron, but then I've seen a whole lotta totally inappropriate bikes on the track to.

    Thanks for sharing!
    "They're not like cars with a body that rusts out in a few years. Keep them tuned and overhauled and they'll last as long as you do. Probably longer." - Robert Pirsig

  4. #14
    Senior Member Lefty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,836
    ^^^yes! Put those wheels and pipes on and I'd love it. But they probably came it $1000 over budget. Oh yeah, some big k&n filters too. I have seen 450 flat trackers with different frames. But yeah, street tracker, I get it.

  5. #15
    Senior Member oupa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Posts
    687
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    ^^^yes! Put those wheels and pipes on and I'd love it. But they probably came it $1000 over budget. Oh yeah, some big k&n filters too. I have seen 450 flat trackers with different frames. But yeah, street tracker, I get it.
    It's a very nice bike. I really, really like it, but the styling is essentially superficial (though I have no idea what's inside!). It is almost a stock (style) bike with a different seat, some cool pipes, no fender and a whole lot of speed holes. I'm not complaining!!!! Did I mention... I really like it? This is what a street tracker should be. A STREET BIKE with some superficial styling that changes little more than appearance. Function - safe lighting, brakes, tires and a comfortable riding position are what's important in a street bike. Compromise on those things and it'll hurt you.

    A tracker changes ALL those things and much, much more - usually. By the same token, you can remove or tape up the lights and race your stock street bike and be okay. Probably won't win much, but you'll be okay.

    My own #1 rule in modifying a street bike is the question, is it functional? Safety equipment is not to be compromised! A riding position you're comfortable in for more than 20 miles. Tires appropriate for your riding conditions. Just about anything else is open to your sense of creativity style! The bike meets that criteria and then some.
    "They're not like cars with a body that rusts out in a few years. Keep them tuned and overhauled and they'll last as long as you do. Probably longer." - Robert Pirsig

  6. #16
    Senior Member -alan-'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    598
    Looks like Trackers are Ok with the Hondatwins massive

    I've started planning a few mods to the aesthetics on my little 450 mongrel. The thing I dislike most about my own bike is the seat. I'm not too worried about originality as the bike is already a bit of a hybrid, so my conscience is clear.

    Looking at those two bikes above, I think there's plenty of scope for a relatively easy step by step rolling modification programme to build a tracker like this above - seat / higher bars / mudguards(fenders) / pipe(s). Do it right and it should look ok at each stage, and also be fully reversible.

    Still torn between the 'mild cafe' look (below - but w/o the ace bars) and the one of those trackers above:

    CB450 K5

  7. #17
    Senior Member FrisianWheel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Baku / Azerbaijan
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by -alan- View Post
    ...Still torn between the 'mild cafe' look (below - but w/o the ace bars) and the one of those trackers above:

    That would be actually more of a stock 450 with a different seat than a mild cafe IMO.
    Gunnar

    1972 CB450 K5
    1975 CB500T
    1972 CB450 K5 - in progress

  8. #18
    Senior Member oupa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Posts
    687
    If you're after a true tracker feel/look, consider wider bars rather than higher.

    Are you familiar with flat track racing? If not, PLEASE check out a few videos .
    I know it's hard but try to pay attention to the way they ride. It's all about traction control on a surface that opposes both traction and control.

    It's a lot more physical than it looks! That's where the wide bars come in - leverage.
    Pops and ancientdad like this.
    "They're not like cars with a body that rusts out in a few years. Keep them tuned and overhauled and they'll last as long as you do. Probably longer." - Robert Pirsig

  9. #19
    Senior Member bill440cars's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Perryville, Arkansas
    Posts
    977
    I think that 450 is Pretty "Bad" looking myself. There might be a thing or 2, that I would have done different, But, it isn't mine and as long as it suites the builder, that's what matters. I well imagine that 450, kicking sideways, like Tom was saying.
    My Continued Prayers for A Friend's Daughter: Bre, Another Friend's Daughter: Brianna & My Brother, of another Mother, Eddie

    Main Rides: '66 Honda CB77 & Suzuki SP250F Main Drives: 2002 Durango & 1971 Dart Swinger

    Hopeful Upcoming Projects: '64 CB77, in the Mock-Up stage, Jawa Model 590 & possible 1963 CL72 250cc.

    "You CAN Teach An Old Dog New Tricks, It Just Takes A Bit Longer & More Patience"

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •