new member and new to motorcycles in general
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  1. #1
    Junior Member pp2000man's Avatar
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    new member and new to motorcycles in general

    Hey y'all I'm Zach. Turned 19 a bit ago and just started first days in college. fun fact I have just about no experience working on anything but now decided to get my 1980 Honda cm400t working again. Ive been in Dallas TX my whole life and this motorcycle has been in my family for going on 40 years pretty soon. like i said Ive never done anything on a car or bike really but hopefully i can change that very soon thanks to a friend who may be helping me with my project.

    But now I'm at a standstill. the bike went from not starting to somewhat trying to start to now will start but wont idle at all, which is better than what it was after my dad and i laid it down about 10 years ago. also Not to mention a pretty severe fuel leak coming from the left side carburetor. fun project this will be.

    ~Zach
    ~~1980 Honda CM400T

  2. #2
    Senior Member budlite282's Avatar
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    Welcome, you've come to the right place for help on these bikes.

    Seems you have a carb rebuild coming up.

    Post some pictures, those are always a good start.
    "If it ain't raining, I'm riding......"

    Work in process:::::::

  3. #3
    Member mikemo's Avatar
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    Aug 2019
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    Zach,
    Working on a motorcycle is a great way to improve your mechanical skills. It's nice to see a young guy that's interested in such things. There is something inherently satisfying when you make an old thing work like new again.

    Carburetor leaks are a common issue when they've been sitting for a long time. One of our board members wrote a fantastic DIY for cleaning these carbs. It helped me a bunch while going through mine:
    https://www.hondatwins.net/forums/63...tin-carbs.html

    Be methodical. Take pictures and take notes. Keep the parts that you remove organized so you don't get confused (zip-lock bags and a sharpie marker are great for that).

    What are you studying in college?

    Good luck
    Mike M.
    1982 CB450SC Nighthawk
    2 x 1988 Toyota MR2 Supercharged (one finished, one under reconstruction)
    2018 Honda Civic SI

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  5. #4
    Senior Member Alan F.'s Avatar
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    Boston
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    Welcome, good intro.
    Please don't forget to make sure your fuel tank is not rusty or otherwise dirty inside, chunks of rust or dirt will flow into your carbs with the fuel, I recommend starting at the top of the fuel chain first. If dirty there are threads on that here, if rusty there are other threads here. Use an inline fuel filter, at least for a little while.

    The search function is your friend. But the Advanced Search is a little tougher to find, this will help:

    https://www.hondatwins.net/forums/3-...ion-forum.html
    "That awkward moment when you end up using advice from an ichiban moto video"
    CB250 Nighthawk projects 92,93,92.
    81 CM400C Sold
    93 CB750 Nighthawk Sold
    73 CB750K3 Long term project stuck in the 'parts collecting stage.'
    Fork Swap info: http://sites.google.com/site/alansdocuments/

  6. #5
    Junior Member Yakeye's Avatar
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    Welcome

  7. #6
    Junior Member pp2000man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikemo View Post
    Zach,
    Working on a motorcycle is a great way to improve your mechanical skills. It's nice to see a young guy that's interested in such things. There is something inherently satisfying when you make an old thing work like new again.

    Carburetor leaks are a common issue when they've been sitting for a long time. One of our board members wrote a fantastic DIY for cleaning these carbs. It helped me a bunch while going through mine:
    https://www.hondatwins.net/forums/63...tin-carbs.html

    Be methodical. Take pictures and take notes. Keep the parts that you remove organized so you don't get confused (zip-lock bags and a sharpie marker are great for that).

    What are you studying in college?

    Good luck
    Mike M.
    thank you so much for the link i just bookmarked it. Ill start taking more photos and taking notes when i get the parts for the carb in the mail. I may even start a thread keeping up with what im doing to it . also i literally just went and bought one of those small clear tackle boxes to organize everything since those parts are so small.
    I am currently studying mechanical engineering and hopefully i want to go into automotive design in the future

  8. #7
    Junior Member pp2000man's Avatar
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    Sep 2019
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    dallas texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan F. View Post
    Welcome, good intro.
    Please don't forget to make sure your fuel tank is not rusty or otherwise dirty inside, chunks of rust or dirt will flow into your carbs with the fuel, I recommend starting at the top of the fuel chain first. If dirty there are threads on that here, if rusty there are other threads here. Use an inline fuel filter, at least for a little while.

    The search function is your friend. But the Advanced Search is a little tougher to find, this will help:

    https://www.hondatwins.net/forums/3-...ion-forum.html
    one of my friends checked it for me and said it looks pretty good. I just got a fuel filter in the mail so thats gonna be going on anyways to be safe. Thank you

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