broken nipple on grip/switch assemblies: how bad?
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Thread: broken nipple on grip/switch assemblies: how bad?

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    jml
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    broken nipple on grip/switch assemblies: how bad?

    I've got a couple of projects that have broken nipples on the throttle and switch assemblies that are supposed to fit in a hole in the bars. How big of a deal is that? It seems like it would be used for securing the assembly to the bar and not just positioning, but is it possible to get them tight enough to be safe without it? I don't recall seeing anything like that on bikes from other manufacturers, but I haven't worked on them all, either. Some of these assemblies are rare and/or expensive and are otherwise fine, so if I don't have to replace them I'd rather not.

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    Super Moderator ancientdad's Avatar
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    The locating pins can be replaced as long as the boss it goes into isn't cracked - a dropped bike can twist the switch, especially if not very tightly clamped on the bars, and break off or bend the pin, but it can also crack the boss for the pin in the lower half of the switch. A used switch in fair condition that still has a good pin can provide a pin for yours if all else is still okay. If the switches are decently tight, they shouldn't move even without a locating pin... and the earlier versions came without the locating pins anyway, that didn't start until maybe around '71 or so IIRC
    Tom

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    Senior Member Richard_Pitman's Avatar
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    We had this debate over on the Honda Hornet forum a while back.

    Folks were fitting Renthal alloy bars, and were reluctant ( or too incompetent ) to drill the bars to take the locating pegs on the switchgear. Instead, they were filing down the locating pins. One guy reckoned that wrapping some electrical tape around the bar, and tightening the switch halves onto that was a good fix.

    I personally disagreed, I can't see that drilling a 3mm hole into a thick walled alloy handlebar, near to the end, is going to weaken it, which was one excuse put forward for filing off the locating pins rather than drilling . My concern was the theoretical possibility of the switchgear sliding off the handlebar on the throttle side. Cranked over in a fast corner, hanging onto the bar grips, could be fatal.
    1970 Honda CB175K4
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    Super Moderator ancientdad's Avatar
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    ^^^Absolutely agree - I prefer the locating pins in use myself and can't imagine a 3mm hole being a significant weakness. Electrical tape... wow
    Tom

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    Senior Member Carnivorous Chicken's Avatar
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    Most of the pins don't need to be filed -- they can simply be yanked out. I've run plenty of bikes without them after switching bars without any problems.
    1965 CL160 project
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    Super Moderator ancientdad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carnivorous Chicken View Post
    ...they can simply be yanked out. I've run plenty of bikes without them after switching bars without any problems.
    Yes, that's why I suggested he might find pins in old switches to replace his. And yes, we used to run them without pins before Honda started doing that and of course, they were just fine... still, I think it adds a layer of security when they're there but certainly not necessary
    Tom

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    Senior Member WintrSol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ancientdad View Post
    Electrical tape... wow
    I think emery cloth would be a much better choice than plastic tape. Drilling, of course, is the best, IMO.
    ancientdad likes this.
    Rick

    Mine is a mostly 1970 CB450K3

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    jml
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard_Pitman View Post
    We had this debate over on the Honda Hornet forum a while back.

    Folks were fitting Renthal alloy bars, and were reluctant ( or too incompetent ) to drill the bars to take the locating pegs on the switchgear. Instead, they were filing down the locating pins. One guy reckoned that wrapping some electrical tape around the bar, and tightening the switch halves onto that was a good fix.

    I personally disagreed, I can't see that drilling a 3mm hole into a thick walled alloy handlebar, near to the end, is going to weaken it, which was one excuse put forward for filing off the locating pins rather than drilling . My concern was the theoretical possibility of the switchgear sliding off the handlebar on the throttle side. Cranked over in a fast corner, hanging onto the bar grips, could be fatal.
    One of the bikes I'm talking about actually did have electrical tape wrapped around the bar like that. Having the grip slide off mid-corner is of course the nightmare scenario, which I'm trying to avoid, but I do sometimes overthink things. I'm glad to hear that other people are getting by without them.

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    Senior Member tbpmusic's Avatar
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    Something no one has mentioned - when the switches get loose and rotate on the bars, some of those wires in the switch can get cut up and cause weirdness.
    So always make sure they're on tight when used without those locating pins.
    Bill Lane
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  11. #10
    Senior Member mike in idaho's Avatar
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    I like to leave the pins out, makes it possible to adjust the lever angles up or down slightly for more comfort. Unless it's some kind of restoration, I prefer to run the wires outside, no worries about cut wires and room inside the tube for bar weights or lead shot to dampen vibration.
    '65 YG1
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