THE KID'S CAFÉ - A 16 Year Olds First Rebuild (Project Log CB350 - 1971) - Page 15
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Thread: THE KID'S CAFÉ - A 16 Year Olds First Rebuild (Project Log CB350 - 1971)

  1. #141
    Senior Member ancientdad's Avatar
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    In a perfect world, you'd get that every time. I've only laced, literally, a couple wheels in my life but all the wheels I've touched and tightened spokes on had some level of difference in tone when the spokes felt properly tight and the wheel was straight, and it rode just fine and reliably. I think just having proper and equal tension, as in no loose spokes, is the most important thing
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    Tom

    Ride along at the drag strip - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20jFPazXlvU



    running points... because I'm too old for mysteries that begin with pushing

  2. #142
    Member BabyBiker's Avatar
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    Ok that is great to hear. I think it is TIRE TIME. (for the rear at least).


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    1971 CB350 K3 (Cafe Rebuild In Progress)
    2014 CRF250L (SOLD: to fund above)

  3. #143
    Senior Member the-chauffeur's Avatar
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    'dad's right. They should be tight enough so they 'ping' when you tap them, but getting the note the same (i.e. exact same tension) from all of them is going a bit far, especially for bikes like these. Wheels don't tend to demand the level of precision you'd want in a musical instrument. Now if you were one of the my life is Harley crew (or any other fanboy for that matter) with crazy deep pockets and a desire to die with more tools than anyone else, you'd already have yourself - and I can't believe I'm saying these words in the same sentence - a spoke torque wrench to measure the life out of your work.

    Back in the real world, your wheel is so round that I'd say you've done more than a good job. There are lots of bikes out there (some of mine included) where the wheels have sections that are out of true at the point where straight steel sections were formed into circles and welded up - the weld section always seems to create a small kick that throws things out left to right. But there are even more bikes out there with spokes that don't have uniformally tight spokes, and others where there's more than half a centimetre movement either L-to-R or up-and-down. In both cases, the rider never notices because, well, tyres - they're pretty forgiving, those rubber cushions. So again, you're looking for tight enough.

    What's important now is that you periodically check to make sure the spokes still ping, and if they don't, tweak them up until they do. Over here, that's one of the tests bikes less than 40 years old with spokes need to undergo every year by law. AFAIK, the tester will tap the spokes while spinning the wheel and look/listen for any duds. And if you do any off-roading or slamming in and out of potholes, keep an eye out for bent or busted spokes as you would with a pushbike.

    Tyres please . . .
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    CL77 (1966)
    CA77 (1966)
    SL350 K0 (1969)

    SL350 K2 (1971)
    CB450 K6 (1972)
    CB750 K2 (1972)

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  5. #144
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    THE KID'S CAFÉ - A 16 Year Olds First Rebuild (Project Log CB350 - 1971)

    Update: 8/13/2019

    Things have been pretty slow the last two days as I got all four of my wisdom teeth pulled (On the first day of school too). Today I’m actually not in that much pain so it’s working out very well.

    With your guys guidance I now have both front and rear wheels tried up. I have ground down the expose spoke ends on the front leaving a really nice smooth finish for the tube to lie on. (Photo Below)


    As you can see from the photos there were some enough inevitable scratches from the Dremel tool while I was grinding. I later went over with some VHT Roll-bar and Chassis paint that I had left over from originally painting the frame. Just to prevent possible corrosion. It doesn’t really matter but it actually match pretty well.

    I was about to buy some tire irons yesterday when I called up my neighbor asking if he possibly had a set that I could borrow. I got really lucky here as It turns out that he actually has a manual machine to change car tires. He will be helping me install the new Avon Road riders later tonight around 7:00. (Lots if baby powder I’ve found is the trick). In return I'll be helping him change one of his tires on his truck that recently went flat. Wish me luck for tonight.


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    Last edited by BabyBiker; 08-13-2019 at 05:35 PM.
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    1971 CB350 K3 (Cafe Rebuild In Progress)
    2014 CRF250L (SOLD: to fund above)

  6. #145
    Senior Member pemdoc65's Avatar
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    Make sure that you have rim strips to put on before the tubes.
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    1965 CB450 K0
    1966 CB450 K0 (current project)
    1964 CB77
    1965 CB77
    1964 CB72 (upcoming project)
    1965 CB72 (current project)
    1964 CA77
    1972 CB350 K4
    1960 Triumph TR6 Trophy (always looking for parts to finish this one...)
    1980 CB750K
    1982 XL250R

  7. #146
    Member BabyBiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pemdoc65 View Post
    Make sure that you have rim strips to put on before the tubes.
    Yes of course


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    1971 CB350 K3 (Cafe Rebuild In Progress)
    2014 CRF250L (SOLD: to fund above)

  8. #147
    Senior Member Richard_Pitman's Avatar
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    (Lots if baby powder I’ve found is the trick).
    Talc to stop the (partially inflated) tube from getting pinched, tyre soap (proper stuff, not dishwashing liquid) to help the bead slip over the rim.

    I've also got some rim protectors, but personally never got on very well using them. Lying the wheel on the ground and walking the tyre on with heavy boots to assist the tyre levers works for me. But your neighbours machine sounds like the best bet.
    1970 Honda CB175K4
    1972 Honda CL175K7
    1999 Honda CB600 Hornet
    1970 - 1972 Random heap of CB/CL/SL 175 parts, slowly being reassembled ..

  9. #148
    Member BabyBiker's Avatar
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    The tires are on! Probably took us about an hour last night but we got both on without any hissing complaints from the inner tubes. My neighbors machine worked very well as it is not the type to scratch up the rims. They are holding about 30 psi each right now and will be stable to just put on the bike. The tires are positioned correctly. My only complaint now is that I look like a cartoon from all the blood rushing to my head. (Wisdom teeth operation) Swelling is a b***h.



    Is it now appropriate to start installing the brake components? Does this mean I can put on the hub cases?


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    1971 CB350 K3 (Cafe Rebuild In Progress)
    2014 CRF250L (SOLD: to fund above)

  10. #149
    Senior Member ancientdad's Avatar
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    Getting wisdom teeth pulled is no fun... I had my first two pulled while under local and nitrous (awake) and I think just being able (well, forced to, since you're awake) to see and hear what is going on contributes to the pain and swelling you experience later after the local wears off. I was the most miserable I've ever been after any dental procedure, so the second two came out while I went under the needle - woke up later, stupidly asked "you're already done?" and went home in almost no pain at all, seriously shorter recovery time. Thank God that's long since over.

    Wheels and tires look great - yep, time to start assembly
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    Tom

    Ride along at the drag strip - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20jFPazXlvU



    running points... because I'm too old for mysteries that begin with pushing

  11. #150
    Member BabyBiker's Avatar
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    RUT ROW:

    I received the parts back from the chroming shop today and they actually came out pretty well. I put two coats of automotive sealant in the chrome.


    Upon reassembly I am finding that I’m having some difficulties getting everything into place. Hopefully one of you guys could help me out.

    I plan on running clip-ons so I will not be using the headlight ears or spring covers. Should this be a problem for reassembly?

    I have simply run out of tube to attach to the top triple tree.

    Should the spring just be compressed more?


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    1971 CB350 K3 (Cafe Rebuild In Progress)
    2014 CRF250L (SOLD: to fund above)

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