Anyone Install a Cappellini Oil Pump and External Line? HELP! - Page 2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 19 of 19
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: Anyone Install a Cappellini Oil Pump and External Line? HELP!

  1. #11
    Super Moderator frogman79's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Ninnekah, OK
    Posts
    4,900
    Franz >>> 450 build >>>360 Build

  2. #12
    Supporting Member jensen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    1,301
    Why external oil lines? Are you going to race the bike ? As far as I know, the only advantage is that oil stays cooler, and if that's your goal, yes it's a good modification. In any other reason it's not necessary to have external oil lines.
    assembly of Japanese motorcycles requires great peace of mind (Pirsig)
    CB450 K0 '66, CB450 K1 '68, CB450 K2 '69, CB72/77, C77, CB400F

  3. #13
    Senior Member Flugtechnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Posts
    489
    I don't know about the OP, but I am adding external oil lines for several reasons.

    1) As insurance against top end oil starvation
    2) To cool the oil. I'm also installing an oil cooler. I've had problems with overheating in stop and go traffic. This might help.

    The main reason:
    3) I just want to tinker with the engine.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    HondaTwins.net
    Advertisements
     

  5. #14
    Senior Member LiamG6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    299
    There is a general consensus that top end damage happens to these bikes due to oil starvation in the start/warm up period, ie if the bike is excessively rev'd or ridden within the first 30 seconds to a minute of startup there is most likely not adequate oil in the top end to prevent wear over time. Buying these race oriented oil pumps may in fact exacerbate this issue because if you read the oil pump installation instructions on valter moto ebay reseller of cappellini parts the final instruction is that oil should be poured into the inspection hole of the filter prior to EVERY start of the motorcycle, this leads me to believe that there is no check valve on the filter housing and oil drains out of the filter housing through the pump after the bike is stopped, meaning there is a slight delay in oil being delivered to the engine while the pump is filling the filter housing and then pumping it through the oil galleries/external oil lines, this would be even worse with an oil cooler if it doesn't have a check valve or doesn't have inlet/outlet at the top of the cooler. Due to the fact that these are street bikes and that most of the oil issues will arise at start up I think these modifications are possibly not helping and may even be hindering the oiling of the engine at this critical time. The primary function of these aftermarket parts is to provide oil flow at high rpm without cavitation like the stock pump at an rpm that we don't or rarely rev to on our street bikes, but the race bikes spend the majority of their time at in race situations.

    I like the idea of these parts, but they are not designed for street purposes and as such should be treated with caution as to whether they improve the engine or are actually just expensive and pointless.

    I believe the cappellini refurbished stock 450 oil pump is a good alternative to NOS replacements, and the paper filter without the external oil lines may be beneficial except for the lack of a pressure release valve which Jensen has mentioned is an issue. (Jensen you mentioned in another thread you added your own pressure release valve to the paper filter unit? Details if you did?)

    I too was captivated by these parts but have since come to realize they just aren't designed for street use, doesn't mean they don't improve things, just means they may not be ideal and may not help and may not be worth the considerable expense. A good starting/warm up procedure, riding style and maintenance schedule may do more for the longevity of these bikes than anything else.

  6. #15
    Senior Member Finnigan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    364
    When my engine is back in the frame I'm going to mill some temporary plexiglass(or similar material) covers and take a video on startup with a stopwatch in view.

  7. #16
    Senior Member LiamG6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    299
    That would be good to know, cleaner than just leaving the rocker covers off or leaving one of the head bolts loose as is a common test of the stock oiling system. You could also just loosen the external line bolt that connects the line to the filter housing, if oil seeps out it should still be full, if not then perhaps pull the filter housing cover off and see if the filter housing has any oil in it after the bike hasn't been run for a day or so. Could do this with the bike leaned over to avoid any mess/loss of oil if it is actually full of oil.

  8. #17
    Senior Member Flugtechnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Posts
    489
    Quote Originally Posted by LiamG6 View Post
    this leads me to believe that there is no check valve on the filter housing and oil drains out of the filter housing through the pump after the bike is stopped, meaning there is a slight delay in oil being delivered to the engine while the pump is filling the filter housing and then pumping it through the oil galleries/external oil lines, this would be even worse with an oil cooler if it doesn't have a check valve or doesn't have inlet/outlet at the top of the cooler.
    Where is the check valve in the stock system?

    Quote Originally Posted by LiamG6 View Post
    I believe the cappellini refurbished stock 450 oil pump is a good alternative to NOS replacements, and the paper filter without the external oil lines may be beneficial except for the lack of a pressure release valve which Jensen has mentioned is an issue. (Jensen you mentioned in another thread you added your own pressure release valve to the paper filter unit? Details if you did?)
    Where is the pressure release valve in the stock system? Or do you mean that because the paper filter could potentially become clogged, a pressure relief valve should be added?
    Finnigan likes this.

  9. #18
    Senior Member LiamG6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    299
    There is a steel ball inside the stock pump that drops into place when the bike is off. Not sure how effective it is but should be sufficient to keep the oil slinger full.

    The pressure release valve mechanism is the transfer piece/spring that is on the stock oil filter cover, under high pressure the spring depresses and allows oil back into the crankcase without going through the oil galleries (bearing in mind this is a low pressure system so "high pressure" may not be all that much). The paper filter unit doesn't have this mechanism and as such any high pressure situation will cause issues, what those issues are I'm not sure, perhaps pushing oil seals out or gasket leaks, perhaps premature wear to the stock pump etc.

    I don't think there is anything wrong with cappellini parts (minor QC issues aside), it just may not solve the perceived problems with this engine. I'd be happily proved wrong.

  10. #19
    Senior Member Flugtechnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Posts
    489
    Thanks.

    I am using a refurbished stock pump.

    I will check out the oil filter cover so I can understand how it works.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •