Tool kit design
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Thread: Tool kit design

  1. #1
    Junior Member JustDave's Avatar
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    Tool kit design

    Hi all,
    I've been browsing the site from time to time (and have to thank everyone's input for getting my '80 cm400a off the ground), but have just got a "new" bike ('83 CM450A) and am looking to put a proper tool kit together for it, but couldn't find a post on here mentioning it.

    Now, I've found this fiche of the kit (attached), but I still have a few questions.

    - 3 - pin spanner
    I can probably guess what this is used for, but is it important to have on the road (tubeless, spokeless tires, if that's a consideration at all), and if so, why?

    - 12 - "P18 box wrench"
    What the heck kind of measuring standard is p18? Does anyone have a conversion to metric that I can use? I'm looking to save a couple dollars on reassembling the kit and to produce something a little more versatile.

    - in general:
    Has anyone put together a tool kit without using OEM parts? If so, how did you go about acquiring them?
    Any input is welcome.

    P.s. I'm younger than the bikes by a decade, so I apologize if I insult anyone's sensibilities by not knowing what to do with a pin spanner
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tool kit design-img_4668_1483991715550.png  

  2. #2
    Junior Member collector000's Avatar
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    Number 8 is for the spark plugs I believe. My advice is to make sure you get oem honda tools. the philips drivers are neat because they are JIS standard and really lock into the screws well. The slot in the middle of number 3 locks into the back of the screwdriver bits 8,9,10 and makes them an awesome t-handle set.

    My method is to try and work on the bike only using what's in my tool kit for most regular maintenance. The idea is that if you can do everything with the kit then there is nothing you can't repair on the side of the road. This isn't always practical of course but a little bit of logic will help you put together the tools you need.

  3. #3
    Senior Member dtsmjr8dan's Avatar
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    #12 is the spark plug 'socket' (used with one of the screwdriver bits)
    #3 is the tool for changing the tension on your rear shock absorbers and the steering head nut
    1979 CM400T (rider),
    1981 CM400T (in surgery receiving transplant)
    1982 CM450 (parts bike)
    1982 CB450 (parts bike)
    Past rides: Vincents, Triumph, BSA's, Suzuki's, Twingle, Corgy, others.
    Remember, today is the tomorrow we worried about yesterday.
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  5. #4
    Senior Member ScramblerCurtis's Avatar
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    #7 is the pliers that you will use to rip off the nose of that redneck that cut you off
    dtsmjr8dan, ctrider and ancientdad like this.
    Curtis

    1969 Honda CL350 K1 - Done (Project Log)
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    1971 Benelli Mini Enduro 65cc - No project name yet (future build)
    1999 Honda XR400R - Project "Ranger" Adventure Bike (next build)

  6. #5
    Senior Member dtsmjr8dan's Avatar
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    #13 slips over the handles of #3,#14,#15 for more leverage.
    1979 CM400T (rider),
    1981 CM400T (in surgery receiving transplant)
    1982 CM450 (parts bike)
    1982 CB450 (parts bike)
    Past rides: Vincents, Triumph, BSA's, Suzuki's, Twingle, Corgy, others.
    Remember, today is the tomorrow we worried about yesterday.
    My chest fell, but, fortunately, my belt caught it.
    I don't know everything, nor, have I met the one who does.

    T-shirt sales supporting 66Sprint's LSR Build http://www.hondatwins.net/forums/22-...d-attempt.html

  7. #6
    Senior Member doode's Avatar
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    I have a couple of these, and they sit in the junk tools bin for the most part.
    Re: customizing a tool kit... Why do you need one?
    I carry a socket wrench and sockets and wrenches, a knife, screw drivers, tape, ties and wire, small crescent wrench, bicycle multi tool and loads of other stuff. I commute 50 miles a day and so far never needed all this junk...
    If I'm going around town, I leave the tools at home.

    Edit: actually I did use a tool recently. A couple weeks ago, I walked out of work to find that the key to my helmet lock/tank had freed itself from my keychain. I used the crescent wrench to break the lock so I could get home.
    Last edited by doode; 01-09-2017 at 10:10 PM.

  8. #7
    Junior Member JustDave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by collector000 View Post
    Number 8 is for the spark plugs I believe. My advice is to make sure you get oem honda tools. the philips drivers are neat because they are JIS standard and really lock into the screws well. The slot in the middle of number 3 locks into the back of the screwdriver bits 8,9,10 and makes them an awesome t-handle set.
    I had guessed at the slot locking, but the phillips driver info is new. I hadn't considered that, and after you posted, I went out and found 3/4 of a tool kit (including screwdrivers) for $25.

    Quote Originally Posted by dtsmjr8dan View Post
    #13 slips over the handles of #3,#14,#15 for more leverage.
    Makes sense. Couldn't reckon it had much other use.

    Quote Originally Posted by dtsmjr8dan View Post
    #12 is the spark plug 'socket' (used with one of the screwdriver bits)
    #3 is the tool for changing the tension on your rear shock absorbers and the steering head nut
    AH.
    So... This is probably something I should do/have done/be doing...

    Quote Originally Posted by collector000 View Post
    My method is to try and work on the bike only using what's in my tool kit for most regular maintenance. The idea is that if you can do everything with the kit then there is nothing you can't repair on the side of the road. This isn't always practical of course but a little bit of logic will help you put together the tools you need.
    Quote Originally Posted by doode View Post
    I have a couple of these, and they sit in the junk tools bin for the most part.
    Re: customizing a tool kit... Why do you need one?
    I tend to ride about 100-150 miles from school to one of two family homes. No one actively lives at one, and having been 5 feet underwater three months ago (thanks Hermine), there are no tools to speak of there. On top of that, my outbound trips generally happen at night (9p-1a), and living at college, the only tools I have access to I own and carry with me.
    I used to have my car out here with a full range of assorted tools, but now I keep it off-campus to save money on parking.
    The question was raised because I have to reinstall my front wheel in the next couple of days, and work on the carburetors in short order, but in essence have no tools available, since I forgot my old "tool kit" on my CM400.

    Also because it would be cool.

  9. #8
    Member JohnnyB's Avatar
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    Regarding the Pin Spanner, Part # 89215-404-670. I've never used one and need to get one but this one looks pretty flimsy. Is this particular Honda tool adequate, sufficient, and perfectly acceptable, OR, is there another Pin Spanner that you would recommend that might be better?
    1979 CM400T

  10. #9
    Senior Member doode's Avatar
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    The Honda tool works fine, but you can get other which I'm sure work fine too. This tool doesn't really see much action

  11. #10
    Senior Member JamesPal's Avatar
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    All of the maintenance items in the owners manual can be done with the standard tool kit. Make additions to work on any accessories the stock kit will not handle. I always carry a spare master link for the chain and spare fuses. Have fun!
    Jim Palmer
    '85 GL1200I (Garage Find)
    '81 GL1100 STD (Project)
    CB450 K5 Done
    http://www.hondatwins.net/forums/1-p...s-cb450k5.html
    "If everything seems under control you are not going fast enough" Mario Andretti...

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